Weapons Part II

By Rio

Weaopnry POVPoint of View
One of the most crucial part of drawing weapons is drawing them in different points of view. When drawing anything, point of view is always there whether it is obvious or not.

To the left shows a sword at different points of view. The center is a sword as it would be viewed at eye level, or from the top down. The others are how it would look in other angles.
Notice that at angles, space changes from thin to wide affecting how a weapon is drawn - thinner handle and wider blade tip. For more info on perspective, check out these other tutorials: One Point, Two Point, Three Point Perspective (tutorials being re-done. Will be linked when completed. ^_^).

Weapon in Motion 1Weapons in Action
One of the most fun part of drawing weapons is when they are in the thick of battle! The quickest way to draw a weapon moving is to draw motion lines. Motion lines are basically just several lines drawn from the object moving to whatever direction it was moving from.

For instance, the drawing to the right has motion line coming off the sword and to the left. This makes the sword look as it is being swung from left to right. Note that the motion lines have a bit of curve to it making the swing of the sword at an arc. If the sword was moving horizontally, left to right, the lines would also be moving from left to right, horizontally.

The other way to show a weapon in action is to exaggerate and "move" its physical shape by curving it, usually in an arc, as well as the motion lines right after it.

Weapong in Motion 2 Weapon in Motion 3

Above are two examples on this method at two different angles. Looking at the two, the motion lines may vary from just the end of the weapon itself or to include surrounding areas as in the case of the first picture.

There are some people who just use a "streak" effect when drawing weapons in motion. The "streak" is like those in popular pictures of cities and vehicles in motion. All that remains are lighted lines. Another way to think of it is an after image. When the item moves too quickly for the eye and it leaves an image "imprint" of where it was before. If this sounds like mindless babbling - then forget I mentioned it. :D

And that is pretty much it to weapons! All that remains is being able to draw different types of weapons - axes, staffs, etc. - and all you really need is a ruler and some imagination for that. :)

Go to Part I



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