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Thread: How to practice

  1. #11
    Your Friendly Ban Hammer-er Rio's Avatar
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    Perspective books I like: Perspective Made Easy by Norling and Perspective Drawing Handbook by D'Amelio
    If you can get your hands on them without paying (I borrowed them from the library), I highly recommend you check them out.

  2. #12
    Zeta Members ram's Avatar
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    hehehehe....
    got my hands on it now..
    thanks so much Rio..

  3. #13
    101 Dalmations Member The_shaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramiel View Post
    man hamachi your so RICH DUDE! recomending books to buy..

    first you should read the massive online tutorial list.. about pespective stuffs..
    rio posted some stuffs there that could help you
    http://www.mangatutorials.com/forum/...als-List-v.3.0
    then you should research on your own... and try what hamachi recomended
    He'll learn more from those two books than more than half of those site to be honest.

  4. #14
    Your Friendly Ban Hammer-er Rio's Avatar
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    Agreed. The problem with sites generally is the lack of depth of information that they offer. If they do have a lot of information, it's not free most of the time. :\

    ...But hey, you take what you can get if you have no other alternatives. It'll be a tougher road but sometimes you just have to take it until you can get better sources and info.

  5. #15
    Regular Member apples13's Avatar
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    i believe that with new technology the old books are becoming very bad at teaching new artists about modern design. once they read it they will be trapped by this old style mind set confused on what to do because it clashes with modern design ideals. on the other hand there are not a lot of modern design books that are actually any good lol

  6. #16
    Zeta Members ram's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rio View Post
    Agreed. The problem with sites generally is the lack of depth of information that they offer. If they do have a lot of information, it's not free most of the time. :\

    ...But hey, you take what you can get if you have no other alternatives. It'll be a tougher road but sometimes you just have to take it until you can get better sources and info.
    i believe what you posted is good rio.. I've been reading other books about perspective now but it seems what information they have are too easy and just auto-didactic.. >.<

  7. #17
    Senior Member Hamachi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by apples13 View Post
    i believe that with new technology the old books are becoming very bad at teaching new artists about modern design. once they read it they will be trapped by this old style mind set confused on what to do because it clashes with modern design ideals. on the other hand there are not a lot of modern design books that are actually any good lol
    Yeah, I know what you mean. Modern ideals are different from what they were in the past, but they're harder to identify. Just as an example I can see the change in trends just in the comic books from the mid-20th century to what they are today - earlier on, 90-degree "upright" and symbolic figures by artists such as Roy Lichtenstein or Stan Lee were pretty popular. Nowadays the Western fad at least seems all about action shots and extreme perspectives, etc. A similar trend can be seen in anatomy books; ex. the old Bridgmans are so detailed but devoid of movement while currently we're pushing for as much expressiveness as possible.

    I would say, though, that there are some principles in observation that never change. I mean, those things should be what beginners have to learn first - contour, cross-contour and gesture, proportions, perspective, etc. and all their corresponding exercises. Heck, I still need to do most of these too.

  8. #18
    101 Dalmations Member The_shaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by apples13 View Post
    i believe that with new technology the old books are becoming very bad at teaching new artists about modern design. once they read it they will be trapped by this old style mind set confused on what to do because it clashes with modern design ideals. on the other hand there are not a lot of modern design books that are actually any good lol
    The thing is, modern design is all built off of those old books or better put old teachings. Only thing that is changing is how new technology goes about doing. /no matter who you do perspective you are still following perspective, no matter how you go about shading you are still following the value scale. Same thing with drawing people and so on, and to be honest its the modern users who bother to learn and understand tradition means of doing things that usually; 1. have a better understanding and easier time drawing or painting digitally, and 2. do to that traditional understand usually produce better looking work digitally and you can argue this with me, but it will only become a pointless cycle that won't end really. In the end as long as it teaches the artist things such as the basics of; how to see, how to think, and how to design it holds some merit since its these 3 things that govern both traditional and digital.

  9. #19
    Super Senior Member CypressDahlia's Avatar
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    Stick with what you can get. If you can afford books, buy books. if you can't, find online tutorials. There is no right way to learn or practice. I never bought or read a single art book in my life, aside from art history texts for college, but that's not holding me back from getting better at art.

    As long as you can learn, it doesn't matter how.

  10. #20
    Regular Member apples13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_shaman View Post
    The thing is, modern design is all built off of those old books or better put old teachings. Only thing that is changing is how new technology goes about doing. /no matter who you do perspective you are still following perspective, no matter how you go about shading you are still following the value scale. Same thing with drawing people and so on, and to be honest its the modern users who bother to learn and understand tradition means of doing things that usually; 1. have a better understanding and easier time drawing or painting digitally, and 2. do to that traditional understand usually produce better looking work digitally and you can argue this with me, but it will only become a pointless cycle that won't end really. In the end as long as it teaches the artist things such as the basics of; how to see, how to think, and how to design it holds some merit since its these 3 things that govern both traditional and digital.
    I believe with our new technology we can understand the fundamentals much easier without using techniques from the conventional books.
    although you are learning the same thing, we have 3d technology and many other types tools that will teach the subject much more thoroughly and easily than learning from conventional books. it is like learning how to use the computer from a windows 95 now, of course you can still do it, but there are much better ways that give you a lot more as well as doing a better job at guiding you towards a modern mindset.

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