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Thread: How can you keep your characters looking same in different pictures?

  1. #1

    How can you keep your characters looking same in different pictures?

    Hi

    I have drawn a couple of characters, but when I try to draw the already drawn character (same face, same clothing etc.) from some other angle, it won't look as the same character any more. I have now tried couple of times, but I'm asking in general are there any tips how you can keep them looking the same? Should I measure their sizes (for example how far their eyes are from each other, how far mouth is from chin etc.), and when drawing them again make sure they remain unchanged.

    This is not a problem if they have same pose, but when I try to draw them in clearly different way.

  2. #2
    Ruler of the Seventh Empire GunZet's Avatar
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    I used to have this same problem when I first started doing my own characters. It all essentially boils down to how good you are at anatomy, and how effective your basic workflow is.

    What you want to start doing is breaking down the body into shapes and understanding how they bend and etc, and how to capture the same body parts in a variety of different poses, aka practice repetition. I say this because if you don't have a solid workflow that works for many different angles and poses, you'll end up doing what you're doing now, which is warping the shapes and features so much that they don't resemble the original character.

    All of this pays off of course, so I'd give a bit of hardcore workflow/anatomy studying a go. Nothing too intensive like skeletal structure and stuff, but things like major muscles and shapes because those are going to be the ones you'll be playing with a lot, and they all interlock with each other.
    <My comic
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  3. #3
    One Thousand Member JJJorgie's Avatar
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    The biggest way for develop consistency in style and character appearance is to practice, practice, practice! But, then there's the question of what to practice. The easiest way to draw a character in different angles at your skill level is to first draw guidelines! Here's a good video to help out!
    SPOILER! :
    You can skip to around one minute
    Quote Originally Posted by Demonfyre View Post
    She has spoken and so we must obey!

  4. #4
    Thanks for advice, I'll study about body parts more clearly and how they interact with each other. But do you measure distances exactly, or do you just get vision where they should be drawn?

    When I draw poses, I first make the pose myself and then look from mirror how it should look. Is this a good practise or not? I have no idea .

    What exactly you mean by effectivity of "basic workflow"?

    (Lot of questions ^^)

    - - - Updated - - -

    (i did my previous post excactly same time as you, so the previous post was more reply to GunZet)

    Quote Originally Posted by JJJorgie View Post
    The easiest way to draw a character in different angles at your skill level is to first draw guidelines!
    When I draw the character I use guidelines like http://www.mangatutorials.com/2004/h...-quarter-view/ but the real problem is that when I switch to another pose, the I can't place them similarly in that guideline. But I'll check that video, it looks promising.

    Thanks for help .
    Last edited by Lazyanttu; 08-23-2014 at 08:25 PM.

  5. #5
    Ruler of the Seventh Empire GunZet's Avatar
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    Using reference and self-reference images to get poses is great, a lot of artists do that, but in the long run you want to be able to draw those without having to always use reference, which is what I mean by an effective basic workflow. It's like having one of these

    Except you can draw it, and in any pose you'll ever want, at any angle.
    <My comic
    .................................................. ......................."Mind-controlling you into thinking this is awesome."

  6. #6
    That video was helpful, thanks for it! Now I understand what you mean by guidelines, I'll definetely try to do the same for my characters.

    Should I prioritize that I can draw characters without any reference?

    I had a plan to start making a comic some day, but this is one absolutely important thing I must be able to learn before I can begin with comics. Perhaps little off-topic, but what skill level is usually good for starting a comic project (about 20 pages)? I know that time is possibly not very soon.

  7. #7
    Ruler of the Seventh Empire GunZet's Avatar
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    Your first comics won't be the best looking, or the best written, that's almost guaranteed. At least in my experience. All of my previous comics have been around 20-40 pages, all dying around that same point as well, and they're ugly as can be. What really matters is that you at least -try- at any skill level, it's all gonna help you in a LOT of things just by trying and even trying and failing, because comics force you to have to draw everything and fill your worlds with things you'd probably never think to get good at drawing. It also reinforces knowing your shapes and etc.

    Anyways, long story short, there is no 'good' skill level for starting a comic project, any skill level is a great time to try. Only you can know when that 'good' time is, and trust me, you'll know.
    <My comic
    .................................................. ......................."Mind-controlling you into thinking this is awesome."

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by GunZet View Post
    Your first comics won't be the best looking, or the best written, that's almost guaranteed. At least in my experience. All of my previous comics have been around 20-40 pages, all dying around that same point as well, and they're ugly as can be. What really matters is that you at least -try- at any skill level, it's all gonna help you in a LOT of things just by trying and even trying and failing, because comics force you to have to draw everything and fill your worlds with things you'd probably never think to get good at drawing. It also reinforces knowing your shapes and etc.

    Anyways, long story short, there is no 'good' skill level for starting a comic project, any skill level is a great time to try. Only you can know when that 'good' time is, and trust me, you'll know.
    That's good to hear . I don't have very high expectations for the comic project anyways. I think the point might be when I can draw all of my characters consistently and that they are recognizable.

  9. #9
    Ruler of the Seventh Empire GunZet's Avatar
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    My best advice for pursuing a comic project would just be to take it slow. I've had my fair share of rushed projects where I just got overly ambitious. It ends up more like a blow to the gut cause you're really winded by the end. I have a new comic project coming up myself, and I've spent weeks sitting on the idea, and I'm on week 4 of writing the script and rewriting and coming up with ideas and concepts little bits at a time, all while I bring my art skills up to snuff.

    So yea, go easy on yourself if you're not doing that already.
    <My comic
    .................................................. ......................."Mind-controlling you into thinking this is awesome."

  10. #10
    I tried to follow the video how to make the same character from different directions, and well I need a lot more of practice .

    I didn't plan to do exactly same character, mut mostly (I used same hairstyle, mostly same expressions etc), for example I like to make nose in different way. Here are the results: Attachment 1322

    The eyes (especially in the first) are too far away, and in the 3rd picture nose/mouth are too low, and the chin looks strange. Well, there is a lot to improve, and they don't exactly seem to be the same character which was the point of this exercise...

    GunZet: Okay, I'll be careful with being too overly ambitious ^^. Perhaps I should start with something smaller?

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