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Thread: Getting started bicycling

  1. #11
    Lord of Death jubeh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClockHand View Post
    Are you fully committed to it?
    Yeah because the other alternative is running and that would suck

    Quote Originally Posted by Hayashida View Post
    are you going to be riding on roads and sidewalks or like sort of offroad. also is there a lot of hills where u live
    Roads

  2. #12
    ハリセン クラプ Ace Pitcher Hayashida's Avatar
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    then you don't need to get a mountain bike. You should look at road bikes and fixed gears I guess. Fixed gears are faster but more difficult if there's hills cuz its hard to pedal up hills if u dont have gears. They're simpler bikes though so they're easier to look after and maintain and shit. Road bikes have gears tho which is indispensable if there's hills and shit where you live. What's your budget for a bicycle?

  3. #13
    Lord of Death jubeh's Avatar
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    Idk about budget yet but I absolutely couldnt go above 400 bucks

  4. #14
    ハリセン クラプ Ace Pitcher Hayashida's Avatar
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    you're gonna want to look at used bikes then if you want to get a good one. Good bikes are pretty expensive.

  5. #15
    Lucky Member corastaur's Avatar
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    check craigslist for used road bikes, regardless you should be able to find a road bike for under 400. If you're in the city a road bike is definitely way better than a mountain bike. Also like others said WEAR A HELMET!!!! Do you live in a biggish city with crazy drivers?

  6. #16
    ハリセン クラプ Ace Pitcher Hayashida's Avatar
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    fuck helmets u dont need 1 it will mess up ur hair

  7. #17
    One Thousand Member indescribable's Avatar
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    Better than messing up your head.

  8. #18
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    Don't forget about retroreflectors. In dusk bicycles are hard to see from a car, and fog too is not something that never happens. I learned drivind some months ago, so I say this from experience. And it's best to have them on the wheels too.

  9. #19
    ハリセン クラプ Ace Pitcher Hayashida's Avatar
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    That is a very insightful and useful tip, thank you for bringing this to our attention

  10. #20
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    I actually started getting into biking a few months ago... my suggestion is to get a road bike. Hybrids can be okay, but if you get a bike with small wheels and a low seat, you're going to be rolling a lot slower than a guy on a fixie. The issue with road bikes is that they're a little harder to get on and off of than a low-seated hybrid; I would recommend practicing getting on and off your bike in a less populated area before taking it down a city road. Also, if you get a fixie, make sure you're aware of what that entails. Most fixies have 'freewheel' modes available anyway, which is what I do.

    The most important thing about your bike is going to be the sizing... you can get this done at a bike store, but it's kinda awkward if you don't plan to buy the bike there (they tend to cost a lot more). Google 'road bike sizing' and similar terms and do your research -- many people have this problem. Measure your inseam *very* carefully, and know the ideal top tube length. It's better to go low than to go high on frame size, but be wary of going too low also.

    There's a bike on Amazon called the Takara Kabuto that, while not the best bike ever, is a pretty solid road bike. http://www.amazon.com/Takara-Kabuto-...=takara+kabuto

    However, it only comes in two sizes, 54 cm and 57cm. I originally got the 54cm version, and it was okay, but a little too big for me. I had trouble balancing since the handlebars and front wheel were so far away. My 5'8-9" brother inherited it from me and it fits him perfectly.
    The nice thing about the Kabuto is that it comes with a kickstand and a chain guard -- while hipsters will judge you heavily for these features, it's kinda nice getting started.

    I ordered this bike to replace mine, in the 52cm size: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/dawes/sst_steel.htm . It fits better, though I probably could have gone lower.

    Both of those are about $250 - so they're not exactly amazing quality. I haven't had any issues so far though; I'm at maybe 100 miles on the Dawes so it's not really been put to heavy use.

    If you plan to do a lot more cycling, you might want to think about something like the Kilo TT, which is roughly $400: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...ial_chrome.htm

    This bike is kind of the standard when it comes to fixies (and single-speeds). The frame is generally regarded to be the best at its price level and the rest of the components are pretty solid too. My friend has this bike and it works great for him; he's probably put 500 miles on it at this point.

    There's also the used route... not a fan, personally, but if you know someone who knows someone or are okay with Craigslist this is definitely a good option. Consider bringing a 'bikefriend' to make sure everything is working.

    As far as accessories go, here's a quick list in order of importance... I can link you what I bought if you need suggestions.

    1) Helmet (roughly $30)
    2) U-Lock ($20, if you're okay with a key version)
    3) Lights (front and rear) if you plan to ride at night; reflectors otherwise but I'd suggest lights anyway. (up to, and over $100)
    4) Bike Pump - get a floor pump ($35)
    5) Some sort of bike toolkit; if you have a good compact set of allen wrenches and a screwdriver that should work too. ($20?)
    6) Backpack - two straps, preferably w/ compression strap. Great for carrying the u-lock if you don't want to mount it or put it on your handlebar.

    You'll probably want to replace the saddle (seat), but that can wait. There are also several options for pedals, including 'toe clips' (come standard on the Kabuto) and 'eggbeaters' (which need special shoes).

    Let me know if you have any bikes you're considering, I have a few bikefriends I can query.

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