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Thread: Icy's Beginner Artwork ^_^;;

  1. #81
    Junior Member Icy's Avatar
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    Another new drawing! I think I'm drawing a bit too many girls; need to work on guys after this.

    12/6/13
    SPOILER! :


    Pushing the limits of how bad drawings can be! If you ever need help, don't ask me. It's probably a bad idea.

    ~~꿀 먹은 벙어리~~

  2. #82
    Super Senior Member Demonfyre's Avatar
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    (Concerning the ecchi drawing) Her spine is broken and the proportions are skewed. There is very little anatomical sense, and there isn't much attention to perspectives etc. I would have a look into studying anatomy and go back to the foundations and work up. Have a read through Loomis' Figure Drawing: http://illustrationage.files.wordpre...-its-worth.pdf it's a great resource for those starting out.

    Look into anatomical principles such as gestures:




    And make sure to use human references when studying the human body; whether you choose to study naked or clothed models is completely your choice. Remember that if you are wanting to stylise drawings then you need to understand what you are drawing first. You cannot make an interpretation of life when you haven't observed and understood the basics of life. Also read this other book by loomis: http://www.alexhays.com/loomis/Andre...a%20Pencil.pdf

    It will help introduce you to basics of art, such as deconstructing your model and building drawings from form. Simple to detail.


    EDIT: i've been too busy to properly elaborate on some details, so sorry for the simple and quick review
    Last edited by Demonfyre; 12-07-2013 at 06:50 PM.
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  3. #83
    Junior Member Icy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Demonfyre View Post
    (Concerning the ecchi drawing) Her spine is broken and the proportions are skewed. There is very little anatomical sense, and there isn't much attention to perspectives etc. I would have a look into studying anatomy and go back to the foundations and work up. Have a read through Loomis' Figure Drawing: http://illustrationage.files.wordpre...-its-worth.pdf it's a great resource for those starting out.

    Look into anatomical principles such as gestures:




    And make sure to use human references when studying the human body; whether you choose to study naked or clothed models is completely your choice. Remember that if you are wanting to stylise drawings then you need to understand what you are drawing first. You cannot make an interpretation of life when you haven't observed and understood the basics of life. Also read this other book by loomis: http://www.alexhays.com/loomis/Andre...a%20Pencil.pdf

    It will help introduce you to basics of art, such as deconstructing your model and building drawings from form. Simple to detail.


    EDIT: i've been too busy to properly elaborate on some details, so sorry for the simple and quick review
    Oh wow, that's quite a lot of stuff. I'll be sure to look into it before doing anything further.

    And I'd just like to say, you needn't be sorry for being simple, because the advice you give is comprehensive and direct. It means a lot for anyone to try to help me, so I'll try to do it justice by applying it. Thanks a lot, and I'll look into all that stuff ~~

    EDIT: I think I'll refrain from giving anyone else advice in the critique threads until I actually know something useful, lol
    Last edited by Icy; 12-07-2013 at 09:37 PM.
    Pushing the limits of how bad drawings can be! If you ever need help, don't ask me. It's probably a bad idea.

    ~~꿀 먹은 벙어리~~

  4. #84
    101 Dalmations Member NWAP's Avatar
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    Everyone has made great points to work on and they've pretty much covered everything, but heres just a few things I wish I would have focused on, and known when I started drawing. On the last picture i can see whats left of the guideline that you used, but always remember that when using guidelines, your anatomy will only be as good as the guidlines you make. Taking a little time to make sure your guidlines are correct will do a world of good for the actual drawing. As far as Proportion go I honestley think it just takes time to understand and remember how big or small things should be. Also, as was mentioned, I can stress using refrence enough, so...refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence refrence...refrenccce. I think thats good for now XD...but keep up the good work.

  5. #85
    En Taro Tassadar Executor!

    So, Demonfyre and NWAP made some really good points there (so has everyone else) BUT! I'm not really sure where you see your art next year or 2 years from now. Since you join, up until now (4 months?) you have made some improvement, but its quite minimal for the progress of 4 months. Now, I'm just going to assume you wanna be a hardcore artist in the future, if you are doing this casually thats fine, but I'm still going to assume you want to be a hardcore, world famous artist and wanna get good fast.

    Start taking advice seriously, Otherwise why ask for it in the first place? I believe many people have mention this again and again, use reference to learn. I'm not sure about you, but beginners have a bad habit of thinking reference is bad cause they limit your creativity and make you rely on them (I know I had that habit once upon a time). From what I've seen, you have just been doing what you have did from the start, which is guessing your anatomy.

    How reference affect your work is how you use it, if you are studying, use a reference for the pose you want, first try to copy it, then do it from imagination, look back, see whats wrong, and repeat, until you have it in your head.

    Learn to see shapes instead, this will help you remember anatomy a lot easier. I personally recommend Bridgman's Drawing from Life book. He'll teach you the shapes and function of each individual segments of the body part.

    Trust your eye, not your guide line. As NWAP mention, is there to guide you, its not really reliable unless you know what you are doing, if its wrong, change it.

    Thats about it, I had more to say, but that would lead out of discussion.

    Only thing that I have notice improve so far is the face. The proportion control is a bit better. The anatomy is still fairly weak. When you draw, dont just mindlessly draw, keep your brain active, Like the last one, her hands arent even connected to her arm. It is this small minor things that will make your art that much better. If anything else, try to make your line smoother.

    Again, if you are just drawing as a hobby, just keep at it and have fun, ignore everything I said.

    Food for thought mate, keep it up ;d

  6. #86
    Junior Member Icy's Avatar
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    I kind of feel a bit guilty for not really sticking to the advice I'm getting ( use reference more, read this and that, focus on individual parts and how they connect rather than just following what you see on the outside ). I'll say that for the most part, my interest in drawing is fleeting. I will, almost randomly, decide to draw one specific thing that I have in my head, which will lead to a lack of application of what people are telling me. I'm not really trying to be too serious of an artist, it's mostly just something I do quite passively.
    I do, however, look at reference for things that are confusing me; believe it or not, my drawings would probably look way worse if I didn't. But I'm probably not doing enough of the "what's actually happening in this figure in terms of muscles/bones/etc?". I'm not too keen on reading books on figure drawing and so forth, but there's a chance I may look into it at some point in time. I've actually done a bit of drawing poses from models, but most of it isn't posted on here because I'm too hesitant on it yet.
    I just hope I haven't annoyed/disappointed anyone if it seems like I'm not using the advice too well. I'm not consciously ignoring it, at least.
    In any case, I'm thankful you awakened me, in a sense. I certainly was expecting the subject to come up sooner or later.

    Anyway, I took a brief pause in the poorly proportioned full body drawings and decided to see if I could draw faces from reference better than I could before. So I redrew one of the old things I posted on here. This isn't something I'll be doing a lot, just got sick of what I've been doing for the past weeks.

    12/11/13
    SPOILER! :

    Before (circa 9/29/13)
    SPOILER! :


    Today (12/11/13)
    SPOILER! :



    Here's the reference picture
    SPOILER! :


    Nose & mouth is probably pretty weak, but about 10 minutes of erasing and redrawing didn't seem to help it. Next time I draw this type of more realistic thing I'll have to actually look that up.
    Last edited by Icy; 12-11-2013 at 11:53 PM.
    Pushing the limits of how bad drawings can be! If you ever need help, don't ask me. It's probably a bad idea.

    ~~꿀 먹은 벙어리~~

  7. #87
    Three Trio Tres Member theAnimeRebel's Avatar
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    Hey, that last one is actually pretty good. The features are a little off though.

    I don't know what people have been telling you to do, so I'll just wing it here. The most important thing is to draw from life, of course. That simply means observing the way something looks in real-life and "translating" that onto paper. It seems to me that most of your problems here stem from two things.

    The first is that your line work needs a little help. Everything is pretty weak and sketchy. Be bold. I think that this has more to do with the uncertainty you have with your subject more than anything. Don't be scared to draw. Who cares if it looks like crap? You need to draw for yourself. It seems like you're getting too caught up with detail and "making something look good" for it to really come to life. You can't force art. Let your hand move more freely. Concentrate on shape and form, and let the details take care of themselves. Look at the picture as a whole, think in general terms. Nit-pick later, or not at all. Draw quickly. Don't hinder yourself here.

    The second thing is that you don't seem to have a very good grasp of form. Meaning, the basics. Remember the cones and squares you had to learn how to shade in 5th grade art class? Well, stuff like that is invaluable. You have to learn to think in 3D, not the 2D space of the white page. Everything in life can be broken down into simple shapes, circles, squares, and circles on squares. It looks like you go from a sketchy little stick figure-esque guide and then jump straight into the details. You forget to flesh things out.
    SPOILER! :

    I'd say, worry about the accuracy later. Following references is good, but it does little for you if you don't understand what you're doing first. Concentrate on form. Remember, basic, basic, basic.

    -tAR
    "Make sure the room is brightly lit and stay far away from the TV."

    (Also, I'M BACK FROM THE DEAD!!!)

  8. #88
    101 Dalmations Member NWAP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Icy View Post
    I'll say that for the most part, my interest in drawing is fleeting. I will, almost randomly, decide to draw one specific thing that I have in my head, which will lead to a lack of application of what people are telling me. I'm not really trying to be too serious of an artist, it's mostly just something I do quite passively.
    Theres nothing wrong with having drawing as a leisurely hobby. But I will say this....Figure out what you are doing in the "critique corner"....becuase while you are in here, these artists are going to give you their best advice at improving. They are "really trying"...to help you grow. Remember this, all the advice that they are mentioning here WILL apply to WHATEVER it is that you WANT to draw. THIS IS THE THE SHORT CUT.
    If you feel that the critiques are pulling you in too many diffrent directions, and you are starting to feel over whelmed, try Letting us know ONE thing that you are trying to focus on at the molment. That way, Most of the the critiques can be focused on on what suits your interest at that molment, and no one feels like they are wasting thier breath, so to speak.

  9. #89
    Super Senior Member Demonfyre's Avatar
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    Just to add to what NWAP was saying, if you are going to be casual about it you also need to be willing to accept that people will generally speak their minds. In the critique corner people WILL provide advice - some harsher than others - and you will need to accept that you may hear some stuff which may not make you happy. Stagnation and unwillingness to apply/attempt to apply also make things... difficult for those who critique. It can be surprising how quickly people lose patience. Just some thoughts I wanted to throw in before the critique.

    Quote Originally Posted by theAnimeRebel View Post
    I'd say, worry about the accuracy later. Following references is good, but it does little for you if you don't understand what you're doing first. Concentrate on form. Remember, basic, basic, basic.

    -tAR
    I would just like to say that I don't advise the above quote about being passive on accuracy. You cannot be 100% accurate, sure, but I would try to strive towards it (especially since most of your work is cut out for you, since you have your reference image). Furthermore, when you are thinking about all of this during studies/general drawing you should actively think about how you can apply this. Understanding is the key to developing your artwork as aforementioned, and is essential for the fundamentals AND your visual memory. There is no point in remembering all the muscles in the body if you don't grasp how they relate to the figure in question. Anatomy is nigh useless if you don't properly observe and analyse your figure and think over WHY it is what you are seeing.

    Anyway, this time im not going to give a general statement as that has been covered in my last post and by many other people.
    You rely heavily on line, and since you are working on a realistic drawing you should try to break the habit of using line to define form and instead move into rendering to describe the properties of the object in question (be that a face or otherwise). The hair is also a mess, I would work on trying to break it down into manageable shapes and work on texturing it from there. You can see approx. 3 large clumps, which can be further broken down into smaller "parts" which will all build into a detailed hair structure. Remember, simple to detail.

    Make sure to properly measure from your reference as the proportions are a bit skewed. The angle is also slightly tilted, whereas you have drawn it straight on. Here is a great - and short - video series which is so useful for tackling portraiture and faces in general. I would highly advise you watch and take notes as it will really help. The short and conciseness of the videos should hopefully make it easier for you to digest.

    Last edited by Demonfyre; 12-14-2013 at 08:03 PM.
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  10. #90
    Three Trio Tres Member theAnimeRebel's Avatar
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    I would just like to say that I don't advise the above quote about being passive on accuracy. You cannot be 100% accurate, sure, but I would try to strive towards it (especially since most of your work is cut out for you, since you have your reference image).
    I wasn't saying that you should be passive in regards to accuracy, but that maybe, if you're getting frustrated with what you're drawing right now, to concentrate on the basics as oppposed to a myriad of technicalities. (So try to be accurate in FORM, but not as much as far as the detail goes.) Details will come later. Worry about the form.
    "Make sure the room is brightly lit and stay far away from the TV."

    (Also, I'M BACK FROM THE DEAD!!!)

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