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Thread: What specifically does inking improve in a drawing?

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  1. #1
    Fenn
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    What specifically does inking improve in a drawing?

    I know inking a drawing is important for many pieces, but I was wondering what, in technical terms, it does to the image. I don't mean "it makes the lines thicker," I mean more along the lines of, "It makes the image clearer" or something like that.

    I ask because for a long time I felt (and still feel) that my sketches lacked life, lacked a certain crispness, but when I went over them a second time and bolded the lines, they seemed to find that life. Is inking truly that important in giving life or clarity to an image? My gut says yes, but then I visit the CC or GB and see very light sketches that still manage to look very vibrant and clear. What gives?

  2. #2
    Ruler of the Seventh Empire GunZet's Avatar
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    It cleans up the image. Unless you use really nice and defined pencil lines, it makes the image bold and brings it to life. This depends on your type of inking. I personally like comic book inking over manga inking.

  3. #3
    Fenn
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    Quote Originally Posted by GunZet View Post
    It cleans up the image. Unless you use really nice and defined pencil lines, it makes the image bold and brings it to life. This depends on your type of inking. I personally like comic book inking over manga inking.
    Gotcha.

    I hope someone else has something to add else quickest thread ever.

  4. #4
    101 Dalmations Member The_shaman's Avatar
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    Don't agree with gunz on the bring your drawing to life part, graphite do it just as well, if not than better than inking to me. He is right about everything else though, and if your going to color it digitally it makes it easier to grab selections through values and cell shade on top of it. Drawing directly in pen can also make it easier for people to see their mistakes, because they won't be able to always erase and try to fix things. I know you didn't ask about direct ink drawing but I just thought I'd mention it.

  5. #5
    Super Senior Member Celestial-Fox's Avatar
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    It adds a technical preciseness to your forms with better line economy than a sketch. When you sketch, your lines can be thicker or even composed of multiple sketchy lines. The bad line economy give the eye a lot of wiggle room to "find" the correct form within a given area. However, when things are inked, the eye doesn't have to work to find any forms, but that also makes things more difficult because you have to be very precise in line placement.

    TL;DR-- Lineart improves line economy.

  6. #6
    Regular Member apples13's Avatar
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    it gives the view the feeling of completeness and professionalism

  7. #7
    Palindrome Member ClockHand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by apples13 View Post
    it gives the view the feeling of completeness and professionalism
    Not true. There are lot of professional and complete draws that are not inked.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Hamachi's Avatar
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    Don't quote me on this, but I think it's because graphite is reflective and doesn't scan as well for someone intending to print the material as a mass-produced published work. Which means mangas, of course. Apparently the stuff that looks and prints the most like ink, is ink.

  9. #9
    Fenn
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    Thanks for the replies. It would seem that regardless of the specifics, it DOES have something to do with the crispness of the drawing.

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