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Ceta
12-03-2010, 05:45 AM
Been reading a lot of books lately instead of manga, so I thought it would be nice to see what books everyone else is reading.




For me, I'm currently reading What if a high school baseball female manager read Drucker's 'Management' (もし高校野球の女子マネージャーがドラッカーの『マネジメント』を読んだら). It's a pretty interesting book so far (I've only read 100 out of 266 pages) since it takes excerpts of P.F. Drucker's Management: Tasks, Responsibilities, Practices and weaves it into a narrative that makes everything very easy to understand and fun to read even for those who may not have an interest in management.

To all those who are unable to read Japanese, fear not: Due to the fact that it's sold incredibly well (over 1 million copies since its release last year), there's a 10-episode anime coming out for it next March. ^_^



(For more information about P.F. Drucker, visit here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Drucker )

Abemon
12-03-2010, 06:06 AM
Granda and Rory :-)

Ceta
12-03-2010, 06:57 AM
Mind providing a little bit more information? I don't know that one. (A website or something to it would be very helpful.)

Rubisko
12-03-2010, 08:24 AM
I've just finished reading the Hyperion Cantos, a space opera about the salvation of the human soul. Even though it's a science fiction story I would recommend it to people who generally aren't so fond of the genre too.
The first book in the series is based on the Canterbury Tales; seven humans from the so-called world web travels toghether in a pilgrimage to meet the mysterious shrike-creature on the world of Hyperion and on the way they share their tales with each other.
http://www.zukunftia.de/wp-content/uploads/2008/04/simmons.jpg

Ceta
12-03-2010, 08:56 AM
Sounds like it'd be interesting to read. How many books are in the series?

Rubisko
12-03-2010, 04:16 PM
4

Hayashida
12-03-2010, 07:56 PM
Right now I'm reading a book called A Short History of Progress by Ronald Wright. I can't really say much about it though, because I've only just started reading it. I think it's similar to Collapse by Jared Diamond, if anyone's read that.

Blue_Dragon
12-03-2010, 11:04 PM
I'm reading a couple books. One that one of my former co-workers wrote that's not published (He hasn't put the title in, and you wouldn't be able to find it anyway.)

I'm revisiting my teenage years by re-reading the original VC Andrews Dollanganger series, I'm on Petals on the Wind. Pretty good books, but kinda weird.

Also almost done with some fantasy book called The Fires of Windameir. It's a typical fantasy: journey to save someone and the would from an evil person/entity and encounter elves and dwarfs and wizards along the way. It's okay. Not my favorite, but it keeps my attention.

Getting ready to maybe start Ada or Ardor if I can get a hold of a free and or cheap copy, or possibly Jude the Obscure, since I can borrow it from mi madre.

Mr_Liebe
12-04-2010, 02:23 AM
The Dark Tower Series.

Dr_Pumpkin
12-04-2010, 03:52 AM
For me, I'm currently reading What if a high school baseball female manager read Drucker's 'Management' (もし高校野球の女子マネージャーがドラッカーの『マネジメント』を読んだら). I


Yeah. That book seems to be pretty popular right now in Japan. I swear I see posters of it everywhere I go if I go into a bookstore.

I'm reading the Hitchhiker's guide to the Galaxy series for, like, the billionth time.

I don't even think I need to introduce it. If you haven't heard about it, you're seriously missing out.

zizi
12-04-2010, 04:02 AM
The Dark Tower Series.



Garth Nix or...?

I'm rereading the Bartimaeus Trilogy. I don't really know why, just like the books. They're comforting.

Mr_Liebe
12-04-2010, 04:08 AM
Stephen King's, I like it.

Lord_Windy
12-04-2010, 07:01 AM
I've been enjoying Martin's Song of Ice and Fire recently, and I'm in the process of acquiring the Thrawn series by a mister Timothy Zahn. It may be a Star Wars novel but I've heard nothing but good things about the quality of Zahn's work.

Ceta
12-04-2010, 10:09 AM
Right now I'm reading a book called A Short History of Progress by Ronald Wright. I can't really say much about it though, because I've only just started reading it. I think it's similar to Collapse by Jared Diamond, if anyone's read that.

I just looked at the Wiki for that. Sounds a little bit beyond my level of understanding..... D:

Is it easy for anyone to read? Or is it one of those books that would only interest those who hold knowledge on the subject?



The Dark Tower Series.

Mind elaborating on the series a bit more for those who haven't read it (like myself). Would be nice to know why you're reading it and if it's something you'd recommend to others.



Yeah. That book seems to be pretty popular right now in Japan. I swear I see posters of it everywhere I go if I go into a bookstore.
Considering it sold over 1 million copies already, yeah, it's understandable that they're pushing the advertising like crazy. I wasn't really too sure about reading it but a coworker and some people I know recommended it to me, so I finally decided to check it out. Although I'm not interested in managing, it's a pretty entertaining and the way it's written makes the excerpts very easy to understand.


I'm reading the Hitchhiker's guide to the Galaxy series for, like, the billionth time.
I don't even think I need to introduce it. If you haven't heard about it, you're seriously missing out.

It's a shame to admit this, but I only got half-way through the series. Unfortunately, the book got lost somewhere in the move out of my parents' house so I guess I'll have to buy a new copy if I can't find it the next time I go back.



I've been enjoying Martin's Song of Ice and Fire recently, and I'm in the process of acquiring the Thrawn series by a mister Timothy Zahn. It may be a Star Wars novel but I've heard nothing but good things about the quality of Zahn's work.

What genre are those books? (For both authors.)

angel_dreamer13
12-04-2010, 11:22 AM
What Happpened to Lani Garver. it is completely and honestly the best book I've ever read.

Hayashida
12-04-2010, 03:13 PM
I just looked at the Wiki for that. Sounds a little bit beyond my level of understanding..... D:
Is it easy for anyone to read? Or is it one of those books that would only interest those who hold knowledge on the subject?

It's a fairly easy read actually. There's less than 200 pages as well I think, so it's no problem to go back and read it a second time. I think if you had any interest in the subject, it would make the book a better read, but at the same time, if you don't have any knowledge of it, it would still be interesting.

Ceta
12-05-2010, 06:07 AM
What Happpened to Lani Garver. it is completely and honestly the best book I've ever read.

Mind giving a brief summary to let us know why you liked it so much?



It's a fairly easy read actually. There's less than 200 pages as well I think, so it's no problem to go back and read it a second time. I think if you had any interest in the subject, it would make the book a better read, but at the same time, if you don't have any knowledge of it, it would still be interesting.

The next time chance I get, I'll see if I can find a copy of it at Maruzen. They have a decent selection of original English-language books from what I've seen but whether they have that book or not, I have no idea. (I rarely go there since it's not very close to where I live.)

Blue_Dragon
12-05-2010, 11:50 AM
If you like to read, something neat my friend does every year is compile a list of 25 books she intends to definitely read that year. She then takes 20 suggestions from people, and leaves the five spaces open for books she stumbles across during the year.

Something neat you might give a go, if that interests you.

Hayashida
12-05-2010, 01:57 PM
The next time chance I get, I'll see if I can find a copy of it at Maruzen. They have a decent selection of original English-language books from what I've seen but whether they have that book or not, I have no idea. (I rarely go there since it's not very close to where I live.)



The book was written by a Canadian author, so your chances of finding it in a book store in Japan is pretty unlikely, since they would probably only sell books by prominent American or British authors.

Ceta
12-07-2010, 05:34 AM
If you like to read, something neat my friend does every year is compile a list of 25 books she intends to definitely read that year. She then takes 20 suggestions from people, and leaves the five spaces open for books she stumbles across during the year.

Something neat you might give a go, if that interests you.

I would definitely give this a try if I had enough time to read. I'm mostly limited to reading while on the train since I have pretty much zero free time at work and am pretty busy at home. If things do manage to change, however, I'll definitely give it a go.






The book was written by a Canadian author, so your chances of finding it in a book store in Japan is pretty unlikely, since they would probably only sell books by prominent American or British authors.

Canada is a pretty popular place here, so there may be a possibility they carry it. Hard to say for certain. I'll give it a look just to be sure. Even if it isn't there, I might find something else of interest. ^_^

Rubisko
12-07-2010, 06:52 AM
I just remembered a really good, but odd book.
"The Childrens Story" by James Clavell. It's quite short, but uses typography to enhance the story. I can't say anything about the story because I'm afraid I would spoil it, but it's worth to read if you come across it. It's not something you read for entertainment though. (but it should just take 20 minutes to read)

Hayashida
12-07-2010, 03:08 PM
Canada is a pretty popular place here, so there may be a possibility they carry it. Hard to say for certain. I'll give it a look just to be sure. Even if it isn't there, I might find something else of interest. ^_^

Oh cool. Well if you can't find the book, but are still interested in the subject, see if you can find Collapse by Jared Diamond, because it deals with a similar topic. Collapse is a lot longer though and probably more expensive.

Son44
12-07-2010, 03:32 PM
I'm reading "Reinventing Comics" By Scott McCloud. It's a really intersting book, possibly a bit outdated, but most of his points still stand today.

Especially the "loosing readership/stagnation" is very much alive today in both american and japanese comics or rather, japan is doing everything Scott says comic/manga companies/publishers should avoid at all costs

Ceta
12-09-2010, 06:57 AM
Oh cool. Well if you can't find the book, but are still interested in the subject, see if you can find Collapse by Jared Diamond, because it deals with a similar topic. Collapse is a lot longer though and probably more expensive.

Okay, I'll keep that in mind when I go. ^_^




I'm reading "Reinventing Comics" By Scott McCloud. It's a really intersting book, possibly a bit outdated, but most of his points still stand today.

Especially the "loosing readership/stagnation" is very much alive today in both american and japanese comics or rather, japan is doing everything Scott says comic/manga companies/publishers should avoid at all costs

I've heard quite a bit about that book from various forums that I've visited and everyone said it was good, but I've never read it. D:

When you're done reading it, mind giving a review? I'd like to know a bit more about it, for example what topics it covers, how well the explanations for each topics are done, etc. Also it would be nice to know whether you recommend it to the members on the forum who haven't read it already. (Reasons why you recommend it would also be helpful.)

Ozzaharwood
12-09-2010, 08:27 PM
I'm reading two books:

Full Dark, No Stars - Stephen King
And
The Sentimentalists - Johanna Skibsrud

Both are good so far, although I'm not very far into them

Ceta
12-11-2010, 09:07 PM
When you finish, please give a review. ^_^

Celestial-Fox
12-12-2010, 03:47 AM
The Dark Tower series has an incredible comic, too! ;D

I have my head stuck in This is Not a Pipe by Foucault, On Liberty (I'M READING IT AGAIN, NOOOOOO) by John Stewart Mill, The Hunger Games by uhIdon'tknow, and to be technical, I still haven't finished The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera. D:

Oh, and I finished Kant's Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals last week. Whewww, finally.

Ceta
12-14-2010, 04:56 AM
Although, I have a decent idea of what The Hunger Games is about, I don't know anything about This is Not a Pipe and Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals. Mind giving a little more information about them?

Hayashida
12-14-2010, 02:20 PM
My guess is the title of This is Not a Pipe is from the painting by René Magritte called The Treachery of Images. Or something like that I think. So it probably has something to do with the philosophy of representative realism.

Celestial-Fox
12-15-2010, 11:37 PM
My guess is the title of This is Not a Pipe is from the painting by René Magritte called The Treachery of Images. Or something like that I think. So it probably has something to do with the philosophy of representative realism.

Yep. It's a nice, short essay in book form.


Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals is a philosophical work on ethics. It was pretty decent in content, but I hate Kant's style of organizing ideas. D:

And as for the Hunger Games, it's got a ton of hype surrounding it, but I'm not too impressed. I'm not too sure on what it's about, though, so maybe I'll get into it later...?

butternut
12-16-2010, 03:02 AM
I'm reading Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. Just started it, it's pretty good, so powerful (it's Ayn Rand, so what else would you expect) Philosophical. So i'd suggest it if you have the patience to read the whole thing, not just for some time-pass.

Ceta
12-19-2010, 03:27 AM
Today, I finally finished the book I've been reading. (What if a high school baseball female manager read Drucker's 'Management' (もし高校野球の女子マネージャーがドラッカーの『マネジメント』を読んだら)) Would've finished much sooner, but I've been pretty exhausted from work the past week and have had a hard time getting through a few pages without falling asleep. Yesterday and today, however, I had enough time to get through the last forty or so pages.

Anyway, the book was pretty good. Quite sad near the end, but the book ended well. I look forward to seeing how the anime will compare when it comes out next year. ^_^

From tomorrow, I plan to start reading book 7 of the Suzumiya Haruhi series: The Conspiracy of Haruhi Suzumiya (涼宮ハルヒの陰謀). I would start today, but I have much to prepare for work tomorrow. D:




I'm reading Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. Just started it, it's pretty good, so powerful (it's Ayn Rand, so what else would you expect) Philosophical. So i'd suggest it if you have the patience to read the whole thing, not just for some time-pass.

For the bolded part, I was wondering, what do you mean?

Hayashida
12-19-2010, 09:59 AM
Today, I finally finished the book I've been reading. (What if a high school baseball female manager read Drucker's 'Management' (もし高校野球の女子マネージャーがドラッカーの『マネジメント』を読んだら))
Damn that is a long title.

Ceta
12-20-2010, 06:30 AM
haha...Yeah. It's pretty rough when talking about it to someone who hasn't heard of it before.

Rio
12-20-2010, 11:14 AM
Anyone here read My Darling is Foreigner? It's a book I saw in a magazine and it's about a married couple living in Japan (Japanese woman, American man). What interests me is not so much the story (though I hear it is good), but that it's bilingual - there is both Japanese and English text. I haven't personally seen a hard copy (i.e. never flipped through a volume) so I want to know if anyone here has ever looked through one?

Ceta
12-20-2010, 02:42 PM
There are two versions, actually: one with only Japanese text and the other with both. Although I have the version with only Japanese text, I have flipped through the bilingual version before and found the translation to be very good. (Although I'm not 100% sure, I think Tony (or his company) is the one who provided the translations just like he did for the movie.)

As for what you've heard about the story, yeah, it's good. I've only read the first book, however. There are several in the series, but I haven't gotten around to reading them yet. Been pretty busy with other things. Maybe one day...

Rio
12-20-2010, 09:53 PM
Oooo, thanks! I was considering picking up a volume but I was a bit reluctant to drop the money for it. Maybe I'll try it out now! ...Of course, it if sucks, I'll come and find you. >:D

butternut
12-21-2010, 02:22 AM
@Ceta:

Well,it's a book that puts you into perspective(don't know if it's the right word). When you read it, you just sit down and think about what the author said. Every sentence has its own significance, and you properly need to sit down and concentrate while reading it to do the book justice, not like you just pick it up for some timepass, say, during a train ride or something. And it's a big book, some 900 pages or so, hence "if you have the patience".

Hope i explained it better! ^_^

Ceta
12-21-2010, 07:44 AM
Oooo, thanks! I was considering picking up a volume but I was a bit reluctant to drop the money for it. Maybe I'll try it out now! ...Of course, it if sucks, I'll come and find you. >:D

haha....Considering it sold well enough to get a movie, I don't think you need to worry. ^_^




@Ceta:

Well,it's a book that puts you into perspective(don't know if it's the right word). When you read it, you just sit down and think about what the author said. Every sentence has its own significance, and you properly need to sit down and concentrate while reading it to do the book justice, not like you just pick it up for some timepass, say, during a train ride or something. And it's a big book, some 900 pages or so, hence "if you have the patience".

Hope i explained it better! ^_^

I definitely see what you mean now. With how rusty my English has been getting lately, it makes me wonder if I'd be able to read it all the way through. (Also, 900 pages is quite the hefty read. I wonder if my attention span would last...)

Hayashida
12-21-2010, 01:23 PM
You know, it hurts me when you say your english is rusty and it's better than mine, Ceta.

Sunny
12-30-2010, 11:23 PM
Going back the reading Lirael.

Ceta
12-31-2010, 04:10 AM
What's that book about?

dbc
12-31-2010, 05:31 AM
I'm reading Kuroshitsuji XD
oh, no, no, it's wrong
I'm reading this thread XDD

Ceta
12-31-2010, 10:46 AM
I'm reading Kuroshitsuji XD
So you're aware, this thread is for books you're reading, not manga.

Rio
12-31-2010, 11:18 AM
Going back the reading Lirael.
That's a book I have yet to read. I read the first one; Sabriel; and I liked it.

Ceta
12-31-2010, 11:41 AM
What are those books about?

dbc
12-31-2010, 07:23 PM
So you're aware, this thread is for books you're reading, not manga.
oh yeah, I'm really sorry >,<
I always categorized manga as a book, so i just put 'Kuroshitsuji' there XD *killed by all members*

Now, i'm just reading a 'Gurita Cikeas' (translated as : Cikeas Octopus (?!)) book, but in .PDF file ('coz i'm poor and don't have any money to buy books in the bookstore)

Blue_Dragon
01-01-2011, 05:23 PM
I'm not reading these now, but they are AMAZING books. I read 'em last year:

The Idiot (really really good, but you gotta find a good translator, I think) and Kafka on the Shore.

About: The Idiot

Russian Prince Myshkin has always been very sickly, and is sent off to Switzerland (I believe) to get well as a child. Upon returning to Russia, he gets sucked into a whirl-wind of changing politics, and hollow people. His innocence and virtue, though admired, eventually play a part in his ruin. His love for two women, one a beautiful, yet jaded and "kept", the other virtuous, intelligent, and kind. The greed, lust, and selfishness of an ever-changing Russia will lead Myshkin to return to a simpler life, to a world not corrupt, and more suitable for a generally good person. This book was really good. I was so impressed with it, the characters are very well developed and the story pulls you in. Sometimes a little confusing, since history and politics of the time play into it (you can find copies with footnotes to explain nihilism and other political movements taking place in 18th century Russia.)

Kafka on the Shore: A total mind f*ck. I loved it. Very existential and post modern (hard to define these terms, so I'll leave it to you.) The story alternates between two character: a teenage boy who runs away to break free of an Oedipus-like prophesy, while also searching for his mother and sister, and Nakata, a "man-child" who has the ability to talk to animals. The stories are separate, but interrelated, and what happens in one "world" effects the other. I think courses should really take this novel and do a good study of it: it's sure to become a classic.

Ceta
01-02-2011, 12:36 PM
I haven't heard of The Idiot, but I have heard of Kafka on the Shore. (Anyone who has read the manga Sayonara Zetsubou Sensei should know it since one of the characters is named after it.) I don't think I'd do well in reading The Idiot since I know pretty much zero about Russian history and I am doubtful that I'd be able to get a copy with footnotes since the number of companies importing books here is very limited. Kafka on the Shore seems like a more likely find and sounds quite interesting so if I get the chance I'll definitely look it up.

Zoe
01-03-2011, 05:14 PM
Going back the reading Lirael.

Lirael is my favorite of the trilogy! Mostly because I found the Clayr fascinating and awesome. :]

Right now I'm reading The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi.

Blue_Dragon
01-04-2011, 12:44 AM
Where are you from, if you don't mind asking? It is classic literature (by Fyodor Dostoevsky,) so pretty much any copy printed has foot notes (not to like, sound pushy about the book: it's just such a good read.) Also, I didn't know jack about Russian History, but I still loved it. You don't have to know the history to understand the main themes of the book.

Ceta
01-04-2011, 06:00 AM
Where are you from, if you don't mind asking?
Japan. Unfortunately, I don't live in a big city like Tokyo or Kyoto, so the selection of imported goods here is not very good. For everything that has been imported, the cost is pretty high -- the reason why I read more books written in Japanese than in English.

Rio
01-04-2011, 03:15 PM
What are those books about?

Whoops. Didn't see your question. Anyways, here's a good run-down of Sabriel:


The novel is set in two neighbouring fictional countries: To the south lies Ancelstierre, which has a technology level and society similar to that of early-20th century England, and to the north lies the Old Kingdom, where magic works and dangerous spirits roam the land — a fact officially denied by the government of Ancelstierre and disbelieved by most of Ancelstierre's inhabitants. (Those who live near the border know the truth of it, especially on days when the wind is blowing out of the Old Kingdom.) These dangerous spirits range from undead corpses known as Dead Hands to supernatural beings known as Free Magic elementals.

These living Dead are raised by Necromancers, or black magicians, who roam the Old Kingdom or live in Death, using Hands to do their bidding. To remedy the problem of dangerous, living dead, there is always a sorcerer with the title of Abhorsen, who is essentially a Necromancer himself (or herself), only in the reverse; he puts the dead to rest. At the time of Sabriel, it is her father, Terciel, who has the job of controlling the endless dead creatures doing evil deeds around the Wall, especially difficult since a new evil seems to be rising.

When the current Abhorsen is overcome by one such evil, he sends his bells and sword to his daughter Sabriel, who is being raised in an Ancelstierre school, out of reach of those who might try to strike at her father through her. She must return to the Old Kingdom to rescue her father and prevent the evil's return.

Delphinus
01-04-2011, 05:33 PM
Ceta, since you mentioned you live in Japan, have you read In The Miso Soup, by Ryu Murakami? It's a great book, about a sex guide in Tokyo and an American tourist he accompanies.

Ceta
01-04-2011, 06:15 PM
@Rio: Thanks for the summary. The book sounds pretty interesting.

@Delphinus: No, I haven't. There are a lot of books that I haven't gotten around to reading yet, but I'll be sure to check it out when I have the chance. ^_^

Blue_Dragon
01-04-2011, 08:43 PM
Awesome taste man! You ever read 69 by him?

Ozzaharwood
01-05-2011, 12:36 AM
I just finished Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King. I have to say, it was p. good. It's a collection of 4 short stories, following fictional murderers and real life situations. All four stories were good, and detailed -although the third was short- and I would recommend it to any Thriller/Horror genre loving people or just anyone looking for a good read.

zizi
01-05-2011, 02:16 AM
So, I got a kindle for Christmas and I LOVE it. Here are all the books I've read since getting it.

Finished Way Of Kings by Brandon Sanderson. That book got into my head, man. It got into my head so much I caught myself using one of the book's swear words. He's such a good writer it's actually ridiculous. If anyone here likes bloody good epic fantasy with an excellent focus on character then I really think you should read this book. Also, the Mistborn trilogy by him too. The world building in both of these is incredible, both in level of detail and the way he manages to give the feel of a real, fleshed out world without infodumping at all. PLUS it has all these amazing illustrations which just lightly help immerse you in the world. SO GOOD.

Also a book I read recently, The Ring of Solomon by Jonathan Stroud. If you haven't read the Bartimaeus trilogy then you can read this anyway, as it's a stand-alone book set thousands before the other three books. Stroud's writing is brilliant to me because he grabs my emotions by the strings and subtly and carefully makes me feel exactly what he wants me too. His book Ptolomey's Gate (third book in the Bartimaeus trilogy) is one of the very, very few books that have made me howl with tears- and still make me cry every time I read it (which is a lot because Bartimaeus is my 'comfort' trilogy; some women have Briget Jones and icecream, I have Bartimaeus). Now, granted, I seem to be a weirdo in that strong emotions of my own are far and few but I overload on empathy, but even my sister (who seems to have the empathy of a high functioning sociopath) got emotional enough to make a "This book is sad" face at me. (Like this; D:).

I'm currently reading the free sci-fi ebook Soul Identity by Dennis Batchelder. (I daresay it's also a book, it just happens to be a free ebook). So far it's well written (if kinda bland- like a turkey sandwich. I love turkey sandwiches, but they aren't the best food, certainly aren't the most flavourful or unique foods. Just simple, good, turkey sandwich.) characterisation is both strong and not annoying (important in a first person book). It's about an organisation that tracks your soul and hands banked money and memories over to your reincarnation in the future. However, I haven't read it all so can't give it a recommendation other than "good so far". I must admit I'm a little bit worried that I'm in for American-style shmultz and gooey sentimentality because of the last line of the blurb which reads: "Along the way he discovers the importance of the bridges connecting people's lives." (Which seems rather tacked-on to the rest to me too.)

These aren't all the books I've read since getting my kindle last week; I've just written loads already and I can't be bothered to write more. Instead you get a quick summary.

Behemoth (by Scott Westerfeld; sequal to Leviathon; awesome steam/dieselpunk WW1 sci-fi)
May Contain Traces of Magic (by Tom Holt; stand alone book; very funny real-life/fantasy comedy about a travelling salesman of magical goods who gets bewitched by his SatNav)
City of Snakes (by Darren Shan; third in the City trilogy; horror fantasy for adults that includes sex, violence, murder, drugs, religious cults, and seriously gross imagery)

Arashi500
01-06-2011, 01:26 AM
Currently reading The house of leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski (trippy, space bending horror, and a truely unique book in it's interactive-ness. Really big too. By uniqueness, I mean the book which is read like an essay of a documentary script and things like the word house are all in blue ink, minotaur in red, and certain passages in crossed out red, regardeless of where in the book they occur, be it the book itself, the table of contents, the afterward, the cover, ect.), I am constantly reading/rereading H.P. Lovecrafts work, and I recently got started on the series by Naomi Novik.

Delphinus
01-06-2011, 05:43 AM
Currently reading The house of leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski (trippy, space bending horror, and a truely unique book in it's interactive-ness.)
It's not a horror, it's a romance.

Kodos
01-06-2011, 03:22 PM
House of Leaves is my favorite book ever and I've said as much lots of times. <3

Arashi500
01-06-2011, 05:12 PM
I was recommended it by a friend who can never finish it(hes tried four times) due to fear.

Ceta
01-13-2011, 05:01 AM
Ceta, since you mentioned you live in Japan, have you read In The Miso Soup, by Ryu Murakami? It's a great book, about a sex guide in Tokyo and an American tourist he accompanies.
I lucked out. Last night, I went to the used book store and bought a copy. In addition to being the last copy available, I was able to buy it for about $1. ^_^

Once I finish the book I'm reading now, I'll definitely start reading it. Kinda makes me wish I had done more reading over the winter holiday. Looking back on how I spent the holiday, I spent waaaaaay too much time watching TV.

Ozzaharwood
01-13-2011, 08:01 AM
I just read Stephen King's Under The Dome.

As always, the King writes another amazing book. This 1100 page book has a very interesting plot, tonnes of twists and turns and leaves you satisfied at the end of it. (It also makes you mad as hell, as the antagonist is the equivalent to Dick Cheney)

I also read Dean Koontz's Breathless.

This was also a very good book, but if I say anything about it, it will ruin it. But out of the two, I liked Under The Dome better.

Renzokuken
01-14-2011, 04:50 PM
Sabriel by Garth Nix. Eh, I was interested and I always finish a book.

In Cold Blood by Truman Capote. For College.

True History of the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey. Possibly one of the worst books in existence. But I have to read it for College... >.>

jubeh
01-14-2011, 05:37 PM
House of Leaves is my favorite book ever and I've said as much lots of times. <3

Even the johnny truant parts?

Delphinus
01-14-2011, 07:32 PM
True History of the Kelly Gang by Peter Carey. Possibly one of the worst books in existence. But I have to read it for College... >.>
You are a pleb; that's a great book.
Reading The Illuminatus! Trilogy because Kodos told me to. Almost finished. After I complete the last book in the trilogy (Leviathan), I'll move onto A Clockwork Orange, my droogs. After that I might make an attempt to finish Ulysses, being the uninscrutabulusnihlconsubstantialistic man I am.

Renzokuken
01-14-2011, 07:38 PM
You are a pleb; that's a great book.


Are you kidding me?

Delphinus
01-14-2011, 07:39 PM
Nay.

Renzokuken
01-14-2011, 07:41 PM
Wow. I seriously cannot stand it.

Celestial-Fox
01-16-2011, 06:18 PM
House of Leaves is my favorite book ever and I've said as much lots of times. <3
Oh, yes. That's been on my list for a while, now. (I'm getting close to approaching it, too.)

Rio
01-17-2011, 11:43 AM
What I'm reading right now: Dr. Dolittle. I'm trying to catch up to some children's lit I didn't read when I was young. D:

Aether
01-18-2011, 10:03 PM
I'm reading Silverthorn by Raymond E. Feist.

It's p. cool.

Delphinus
01-19-2011, 10:06 AM
Reading A Clockwork Orange now. Alex is an inspiration.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v90KPJ6n4Ew

Joosh
01-19-2011, 09:09 PM
Ive been reading Terry Pratchets "Good Omens"
And C.S. Lewis' Narnia "The Voyage of the dawn treader"
For all my life I thought narnia was bad.
HOW SO VERY WRONG I WAS.

wolfman
01-20-2011, 06:53 PM
im reading 3 things atm ._. the origin of species, wolf talk by shaun ellis and the fifth sorceress by robert newcomb

toast
01-20-2011, 07:11 PM
I&#039;m reading the Hitchhiker&#039;s guide to the Galaxy series for, like, the billionth time.

this ^ haha. epic book, I have the Ultimate Hitchikers Guide to the Galaxy, so it' s the whole series in one book. its enormous, like 815 pages. but I love it. Marvin is an inspiration

aaaand I'm reading a book called pretties, which is a little bit interesting..kind of. My friend wanted me to read it soo.
ALSO I'm trying to reread this book I've had forever, and it's called The Great Tree of Avalon. I literally haven't read the series since I was 8, so this shall be interesting. The beginning is cool so far.

I'm actually really slow at reading books, since I will read like 30 pages at a time then leave the book for two weeks, then go back to continue it. I think it's because I'm lazy lawl

Arashi500
01-22-2011, 01:11 AM
im reading the temeraire series currently.

Afrobit
01-22-2011, 01:23 AM
Was finishing up Frankenstein, but I got bored with it.

D:

Slightly better than Dracula.

Evil_Cake
01-22-2011, 01:34 AM
man how far did u get

jubeh
01-22-2011, 01:37 AM
Yeah frankenstein gets pretty wild later on.

Afrobit
01-22-2011, 01:37 AM
Like 100 pages or so.

Somehow I reached over 300 pages in Dracula.

I read quickly, but the books didn't do anything for me.

Evil_Cake
01-22-2011, 01:55 AM
had he even made the monster yet by that point

Afrobit
01-22-2011, 02:08 AM
The monster comes in early. (More of a late-early.) He's there for a short bit of time and runs off. He doesn't show up again until Frankenstein meets him in person.

It tends to be a story of revenge and regret. SPOILERS: (Frankenstein regrets his thirst of knowledge because it lead him to create the monster. He abandons it, and it learns how to be human. It learns of Frankenstein's abandonment through reading Paradise Lost. Frankenstein also betrays the monster later on which causes him to swear revenge. It achieves revenge by killing Frankenstein's close loved ones.)

Electric_Nomad
01-22-2011, 04:23 AM
George Orwell's 1984. Worry not, it will be followed by Aldous Huxley's Brave New World.

Delphinus
01-22-2011, 09:41 AM
Ahaha, Brave New World is even more cynical and depressing than 1984. At least 1984 isn't trying to push anarcho-primitivist propaganda in your face through the entire damn book.

DrPumpkin
01-22-2011, 09:53 AM
Trying to get through all Raymond Chandler's Phillip Marlowe books.

I'm loving it.

Electric_Nomad
01-22-2011, 09:54 AM
Ahaha, Brave New World is even more cynical and depressing than 1984. At least 1984 isn't trying to push anarcho-primitivist propaganda in your face through the entire damn book.
According to the reviews, Huxley's predictions were a bit more accurate than Orwell's. After finishing those two, I am going for "Fahrenheit 451" after finishing all that.

Do you recommend F-541?

GunZet
01-22-2011, 12:09 PM
WarHammer Palace of the plague lord

C.L. Werner

*it's p. boring so far...but it's something to read I guess.

Kodos
01-22-2011, 12:28 PM
Words
Do we really need spoiler tags for a book that is nearly 200 years old? I think the statute of limitations for spoilers expired on that one.

Afrobit
01-22-2011, 02:25 PM
Do we really need spoiler tags for a book that is nearly 200 years old? I think the statute of limitations for spoilers expired on that one.

I'm so deeply sorry there are those who have not read or heard of the original version.

Kodos
01-22-2011, 02:35 PM
I was being facetious. No need to get butthurt.

And FYI I believe we do have spoiler tags.

Edit for content: I'm currently not reading anything. Last book I bought and read was Surface Detail by Iain M. Banks. Still need to pick up something new. Well, I've re-read a few books of mine in the interim between then and now, but I don't think that counts?

Ceta
01-23-2011, 07:55 AM
Do you recommend F-541?
Probably won't compare to 1984, but Fahrenheit 451 was a pretty good read. I read both when I was in high school so I don't really remember which one was better. All I remember is that they were both enjoyable.

Ceta
02-03-2011, 05:59 AM
Double-posting, but it's been several days since my last post so I guess it's all right, right?

Anyway, just finished reading book 7 of the Suzumiya Haruhi series. (Well, yesterday, anyway.) Although I still like book 4 the most, I really enjoyed this one. For those of you who haven't been reading the series, I do recommend checking it out when you get the chance. If you would like more information on the series, you can check it out here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Haruhi_Suzumiya_light_novels. There, you can check out summaries for each book, see which books are currently available and when the next will be released.

Although I said before that I would read Ryu Murakami's In The Miso Soup next, I decided to hold off on that in order to read the next two books in the series -- The Anger of Haruhi Suzumiya (涼宮ハルヒの憤慨) and The Dissociation of Haruhi Suzumiya (涼宮ハルヒの分裂) -- due to the fact that I just learned the 10th book will be released this May. Yay! (^o^)9

PWhit
02-06-2011, 12:17 AM
I'm reading Essential Manners for Men. That's about all you need to know.

Ceta
02-06-2011, 12:34 AM
I'm reading Essential Manners for Men. That's about all you need to know.
I would be amazed/shocked beyond words if no one could figure out what that book was about. D:

Hayashida
02-06-2011, 12:48 AM
I've got a book that I am going to start reading soon called Barney's Version by Mordecai Richler. If anyone has read it, what did you think of it?

Ceta
02-20-2011, 04:19 AM
Finally finished reading The Anger of Haruhi Suzumiya (涼宮ハルヒの憤慨) last night. Took a little bit longer than expected due to an unexpected (and unfortunate) event. While I was riding on the train to work, I dozed off while reading. When I woke up, I rushed out the train but didn't notice until I got to work that the book was gone. I didn't recall dropping the book when I got up, so 1) I dropped it on the seat next to me or on the floor while I was sleeping or 2) it was stolen while I was sleeping. Either way, the book was never recovered and I had to buy a new copy.

Since I was told to wait a couple days just in case to see if it would turn up before heading out to get a replacement, I decided to read a bit of In the Miso Soup in the meantime. So far it's pretty interesting despite the fact that I'm only 40 pages in. I look forward to reading the rest to see how things turn out for Kenji. ^_^

I look forward to starting The Dissociation of Haruhi Suzumiya (涼宮ハルヒの分裂) tomorrow. I would start reading it today but I've still got a ton of things left to do. D:

Ceta
02-24-2011, 05:33 AM
Just wondering, how many of you read books through digital format rather than analog? Also, if you read your books digitally, what programs do you use? (What you're currently reading would also be nice to know. ^_^)

Hayashida
02-24-2011, 01:49 PM
The only thing I could use to read books digitally is my computer and that'd be really weird to read an entire book that way. Though even if I did have an iPad or a Kindle I think I would prefer to have the actual book in my hands.
Atm im not reading anything though. >__>

butternut
02-24-2011, 01:57 PM
Me too, I use my comp, but only for books I read generally for passing away time, or for books that hold not much meaning. I would prefer reading actual books anyday anytime no matter what. Nothing as engrossing as an awesome page-turner!

Hayashida
02-24-2011, 02:06 PM
Actually I should say that I use my computer for reading comics, but yeah, not full novels. After a while it would be just too hard on the eyes.

butternut
02-24-2011, 02:09 PM
Its fine for small ones..like upto 200-250 pages probably. I'd read a couple of them.

Evil_Cake
02-24-2011, 05:59 PM
I'm still reading Warriors of God. Saladin is too nice. except for that time when he hacked off someone's arm

Rio
02-24-2011, 06:33 PM
I still prefer the good old fashioned physical book. I'm not adverse to reading digital books though and I have read some short novels via PDF. I would get my hands on more but the selection is not really to my liking (i.e. I don't like the choices; there's not that many) <--- for e-books in the library; not for purchase through Kindle/nook/iPad, etc.

Ceta
03-02-2011, 05:42 AM
Are E-books becoming popular in the US or are physical books still the main way people read? For here, though it has gained some ground, it's not a major source for reading. I think that if more formats, like the Kindle, were available it'd pick up a bit more, but it's only available in US (and other other English-speaking countries, I guess?). I do know some people here who have it, but it's just due to the fact that they're using it to study English; to my knowledge, there aren't any books in Japanese available on it.

But, I do agree with you guys. I much prefer having a physical book over a digital book. While I do have some books in digital format, it's a little bit harder to read than a paperback since it's on my iPhone. Probably wouldn't be so bad if I had an iPad or something with a much larger screen, but yeah, feeling like I'm burning holes in my retinas after a while is not fun.

Rio
03-02-2011, 12:45 PM
I can't say how popular it is but it has created it's own space in the book market. Amazon's really pushing the Kindle with low prices and lots of free books they offer. With the Nook and iPad available as well, reading on a portable device has really made it possible for those who like to read on the go or who don't have space for all the books to physically carry.

I'm surprised there isn't really that much in Japan since they're like a pro-portable gadgets society... at least from my perspective.

Evil_Cake
03-02-2011, 01:05 PM
the kindle is nice and easy on the eyes like a normal book

Celestial-Fox
03-02-2011, 07:20 PM
My sister really enjoys her Nook, especially since it takes the hassle out of going to the bookstore/library if you want another book. (She's the kind of person who will saw through a book and a half in a day.)

Delphinus
03-02-2011, 07:26 PM
I don't know what to read next. :(
I've got a load of unread books on my shelves that I should really finish off, but on the other hand I really want to read The Ego and His Own by Max Stirner. There's just one problem; when I read I can't write very well, and when I write I can't read very well. >__>

Evil_Cake
03-02-2011, 09:30 PM
well just stop doing both and then u can do both well

The_missing_username
03-04-2011, 02:54 PM
I'm currently reading a book called "The knife of never letting go" a friend reccomended it to me. Now go and take it out of your local library or whatever, it's a brilliant book.

Ceta
03-04-2011, 06:19 PM
I can't say how popular it is but it has created it's own space in the book market. Amazon's really pushing the Kindle with low prices and lots of free books they offer. With the Nook and iPad available as well, reading on a portable device has really made it possible for those who like to read on the go or who don't have space for all the books to physically carry.
While I'm not sure if the Nook is available here, the Kindle isn't (last time I checked, anyway). For the Kindle, you need to order it from the US store and then get it shipped overseas -- which is how the people I know got them. As for the iPad/iPhone, yeah, it has iBooks. However, the content is pretty much English-only; although there is some stuff in other languages, no content in Japanese has been released yet.


I'm surprised there isn't really that much in Japan since they're like a pro-portable gadgets society... at least from my perspective.
There are programs/places I can go to download books in Japanese for the iPhone, but most of the stuff available is not really new or almost-exclusively sells manga. Most new books, from what I've seen are available only in print format. There is one exception that I can think of, but I read that one via book so I didn't feel the need to buy the digital version.

Ozzaharwood
03-04-2011, 08:13 PM
Read a tonne of books during my hiatus.

Kenneth Oppel - Airborn
Dean Koontz - One Door Away From Heaven
Tom Clancy - Dead or Alive
John Grisham - The Confession
Stephen King - On Writing
Stephen King - The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon

All were good, as they always are from these authors.

Airborn is about a kid on an airship who saves a hot air balloon, with a dead man inside and a lot of secrets to uncover.
One Door Away From Heaven was by far my favorite of them all. I can't say much about it except it follows a woman named Michelina. When neighbours move next door and she believes they will kill their daughter, she goes on a mission to stop it. Many twists, not what you'd expect at all.
Dead or Alive is a story about a BlackOps soldier who has to find out what's going on in the government and stop it before it's too late.
The Confession is about the wrongful conviction of a man named Donte Drumm in Texas, and a lawyer and priest's determination to stop the execution. (The priest believes he has the real murderer)
On Writing is a memoir of Stephen King's life, and an instructional manual on fictional writing. This book is brilliant, and you should really check it out if you are a writer. You don't even have to like Stephen King to like this.
The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon is about a girl who gets lost in the woods and only her love for the Red Sox player, Tom Gordon, can get her out.

All of these reviews are very vague, so I must apologize. In a lot of them, though, if I do say anything of importance it will ruin the story. All I can say is that I enjoyed all of these books very much, but you may want to watch out for "Dead or Alive" as it can very confusing at some parts because of the military terms Tom Clancy uses. Also, I think "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon" is the worst book by Stephen King so far, but I believe it's still worth the read.

If you have any questions about any book, just ask and I'll tell. :D

Ceta
03-05-2011, 11:15 AM
I envy the fact that you were able to read that much during your hiatus. For me, on top of being a slow reader, my time is very limited so it takes quite a lot of time to get through one book. On average, I get through about 20 pages a day, which takes forever when most of the books I read are around 300 pages or so. I'd likely get through books much faster if my time weren't so limited by work, but still....

Out of curiosity, why do you think is "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon" Stephen King's worst book?

Rio
03-05-2011, 11:40 AM
Kenneth Oppel - AirbornI recommend this as well. There's also a sequel which I haven't had a chance to read yet. Maybe one day...

Btw, I heard that they're considering a film adaptation of this book. I think it would be pretty interesting and action-packed.

butternut
03-05-2011, 12:47 PM
I almost finished Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged (wasn't able to read for about a month when I just came to college, partly because of work and stuff, partly due to my laziness). It's awesome!! I'm in the last but third chapter where it's like the whole summary of the book put directly in the form of a dialogue, so I got kinda tired -_-" but well, it's a must read, especially for those who're into philosophy. I'm gonna take up her Fountainhead. I have a feeling I'll like it more, coz it's about an architect. xD

Anyway, Atlas Shrugged. 'Who is John Galt?' What happens when the motor of the world stops? When there is no mind capable of producing or creating? the book revolves around this. The descriptions of characters, of scenes, of the emotions, is really good, that it actually induces emotions while reading (though it might be just me, I get extremely involved). I totally fell in love with the characters, and totally hate the antagonists. Sometimes the plot may seem just extreme, like 'this can never happen in real life, such people just can't exist', but it's fiction and she's just trying to prove a point and put the values and ideals across, so I guess it's okay. Up to you guys. Well, like I said earlier, it's a really huge book so make sure you have lots of concentration and patience and time when you pick it up. =)

And yeah, there's a movie being made too!

There was a book-fair a few days ago, I'd bought Swan Thieves by Elizabeth Kostova, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (Part-1 of the Millennium Trilogy) and a short-stories book by Jeffery Archer. Swan Thieves seemed really interesting, it's about a psychotic painter. A review when I read the book. =)

Ozzaharwood
03-05-2011, 01:28 PM
I recommend this as well. There's also a sequel which I haven't had a chance to read yet. Maybe one day...

Btw, I heard that they're considering a film adaptation of this book. I think it would be pretty interesting and action-packed.

YES I KNOW. I want to read the new one (I think it's called Skybreaker?) and I hope the movie is as good as the book. (Book to movie adaptations IMO usually ruin the story, but there are a select few that enrich it)


Out of curiosity, why do you think is "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon" Stephen King's worst book?

It's prolly because it wasn't really scary. It also seemed it was aimed for a younger audience then he usually writes. When I read one of his books, I expect to be scared, thrilled and saying "WTF" after every page. I think because of that expectation, this book let me down. If I didn't have this expectation, I'd probably like it a lot more.

Ceta
03-07-2011, 06:22 AM
I'm pretty happy right now. I was able to get my pre-order in for the 10th book in the Suzumiya Haruhi series. \(^o^)/ Though I have to wait until around/after May 25 for it to arrive, I am really looking forward to it. Still have around 100 pages left to read in the 9th book, but it shouldn't take too much longer to finish.

The 9th book is pretty good and very interesting in comparison to other books that I've read. The most interesting part is that the story has split into two parts -- Alpha and Beta -- telling the story progression in two different ways. The two parts are told in pieces, labeled numerically, which alternate from time to time and can be a bit confusing if you forget which part you're reading. (I'm a bit forgetful at times, so I find myself having to go back and look at whether I'm reading the Alpha or Beta part whenever I do.)


YES I KNOW. I want to read the new one (I think it's called Skybreaker?) and I hope the movie is as good as the book. (Book to movie adaptations IMO usually ruin the story, but there are a select few that enrich it)
I wonder if that book made it here. Guess I'll have to look into it when I get the chance.


It's prolly because it wasn't really scary. It also seemed it was aimed for a younger audience then he usually writes. When I read one of his books, I expect to be scared, thrilled and saying "WTF" after every page. I think because of that expectation, this book let me down. If I didn't have this expectation, I'd probably like it a lot more.
ah....Outside of the Goosebumps books that I read when I was younger, I really haven't read anything by him so I probably wouldn't mind it. I did see a couple of the movie adaptations for his regular novels, but it's hard to compare when you haven't read the book.

Blue_Dragon
03-07-2011, 06:32 AM
I just started reading The Worm Ouroboros, but I haven't had a chance to get very far. I like the few page I've read...interesting language (poetic, a bit medieval-ish.) It's been on my list for a while, anyhow.

Anyone ever read it? If so, is it worth my time?

Ceta
03-07-2011, 06:53 AM
I just started reading The Worm Ouroboros, but I haven't had a chance to get very far. I like the few page I've read...interesting language (poetic, a bit medieval-ish.) It's been on my list for a while, anyhow.

Anyone ever read it? If so, is it worth my time?
Haven't read it, but this might help you out: http://www.sfsite.com/07b/wo85.htm. Looks to be a worthwhile read based on what I've seen there. There's also this review -- http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/booksblog/2009/oct/02/fantasy-worm-ouroboros-eddison -- which describes the book in slightly different (better?) detail.

Blue_Dragon
03-07-2011, 07:35 AM
Thanks!

Oh, and very late...happy er...belated birthday. I saw the thread, but I can't post this late in the game.

wolfman
03-07-2011, 08:35 AM
wise mans fear, anyone who hasnt read the first one, name of the wind buy it and read it now

Ozzaharwood
03-07-2011, 05:59 PM
I recently started reading a book for school, called "The Kite Runner", and have been pleasantly surprised. Usually school issued books lack in story and feeling, but this is the complete opposite. It's a dramatic, horrific, and amazing story, but I'm afraid I can't tell you more.

This book has A LOT of spoilers so don't bother reading reviews or summaries. Instead, read this first paragraph from a reviewer:

"One of the most different and compelling books I've read in years, The Kite Runner is a story told to a Western audience of a culture almost completely foreign to them. I swallowed up the little references to Afghani customs and daily life as much as I did the story itself. Even the revealing tales of the refugee community in the United States made for fascinating reading."

I can't reveal any more of the review as it contains many spoilers, and as do almost all the others. Just do yourself a favour - pick this book up and give it a go.

EDIT: This book has also won a tonne of awards, so if you don't believe in me, believe in the reviewers.

Evil_Cake
03-07-2011, 07:27 PM
reading about the battle of jaffa. really cool

butternut
03-08-2011, 02:38 AM
I recently started reading a book for school, called "The Kite Runner", and have been pleasantly surprised. Usually school issued books lack in story and feeling, but this is the complete opposite. It's a dramatic, horrific, and amazing story, but I'm afraid I can't tell you more.

I'm surprised you haven't heard of this book. It's one of the really well known books. Yeah, as you mentioned it's won a lot of awards and stuff. It's also made into a movie of the same name.

I haven't read it yet, I will once I find it. (Don't want to read the e-book even if it's there)

Bacon_Barbarian
03-08-2011, 05:59 AM
"A Prayer for Owen Meany" a little preachy (on Religion and the evils of Reagan and Vietname), but a good read.

Lucifer
03-08-2011, 07:30 AM
Just finished 'Ultramarijn' (which translates to ultramarine) for school, which imho wasn't that great book. It felt rushed at times and I'm still not quite sure what the actual story was.

About to start in 'De Duivel en de Maagd' (which roughly translates to 'the devil and the virgin').

Still have 6 books (7 if I include 'Homo faber' which I have to read for my German Exam) to read this week. Guess I better get cracking at it.

Blue_Dragon
03-08-2011, 09:18 AM
"A Prayer for Owen Meany" a little preachy (on Religion and the evils of Reagan and Vietname), but a good read.


That was also turned into a film called Simon Burch (changed the name). I think the same dude wrote The World According to Garp which was hilarious (though, long. Kinda dark humor at times :P) This was made into a movie, too (with Robin Williams in it.)

Delphinus
03-08-2011, 12:21 PM
I recently started reading a book for school, called "The Kite Runner", and have been pleasantly surprised. Usually school issued books lack in story and feeling, but this is the complete opposite. It's a dramatic, horrific, and amazing story, but I'm afraid I can't tell you more.
Kite Runner is overrated, prize-targeting crap. It's basically just written to win prizes. Personal conflict and atonement in a third-world country? Critics eat that shit up like hotcakes. Kite Runner isn't a bad book, no, and it obviously has the ability to raise emotions in people, but its literary merit is dubious and really it's nothing better than a well-written sob story. There ought to be an entire section in bookstores marked "Prize Bait".
So basically, you'd be better off spending your time reading something that's actually thoughtful rather than being a cynical exercise in making middle-aged women and over-emotional nerds blub hot tears into their handkerchiefs and have critics stroke their beards thoughtfully. I didn't mind the Kite Runner as a book, but christ do I hate everything it stands for. It's practically a guide to everything wrong with the literary establishment.

On the other hand, Life of Pi had similar acclaim to The Kite Runner but far more literary merit.

Ozzaharwood
03-08-2011, 07:31 PM
Kite Runner is overrated, prize-targeting crap. It's basically just written to win prizes. Personal conflict and atonement in a third-world country? Critics eat that shit up like hotcakes. Kite Runner isn't a bad book, no, and it obviously has the ability to raise emotions in people, but its literary merit is dubious and really it's nothing better than a well-written sob story. There ought to be an entire section in bookstores marked "Prize Bait".
So basically, you'd be better off spending your time reading something that's actually thoughtful rather than being a cynical exercise in making middle-aged women and over-emotional nerds blub hot tears into their handkerchiefs and have critics stroke their beards thoughtfully. I didn't mind the Kite Runner as a book, but christ do I hate everything it stands for. It's practically a guide to everything wrong with the literary establishment.

On the other hand, Life of Pi had similar acclaim to The Kite Runner but far more literary merit.

Haters gonna hate. C:<

I have to agree with you, but if you don't give a crap about literary merit (Which most people don't) it's still a good book.

I now just started reading Dean Koontz's "False Memory". Good so far, I'll tell you about it once I've read more.

Celestial-Fox
03-09-2011, 02:57 AM
I've never read The Kite Runner, even though it's on a bookshelf in our house. I heard it was good, and I'll probably try to read it sometime this year, despite all the Del-hatin'. XD

Ceta
04-06-2011, 03:32 AM
Just finished reading In The Miso Soup. It was pretty good, but after what happened near the end of the second part, it kinda felt a little empty. Although it brought up some interesting points about foreigners and some of the things they encounter when living in Japan/dealing with Japanese people, in a way it kinda makes you want to read more of the scary stuff rather than Frank's history. Not to say that it wasn't interesting, but it makes you wish that the feeling created by the events near the end of the second part could've lasted/continued up to the end.

I do recommend it, though. It was pretty good.

Evil_Cake
04-06-2011, 01:00 PM
I'm reading The Inimitable Jeeves by p.g. wodehouse, Persian Fire by Tom Holland, and Hannibal idk who its by though

Ceta
04-07-2011, 07:25 AM
Why are you reading three books at the same time? (o_o?

Evil_Cake
04-07-2011, 12:21 PM
because 1 of them is in my car so in bed I just read one of the other two

Ceta
04-07-2011, 12:53 PM
One in your car? Are traffic jams incredibly bad where you live?

Evil_Cake
04-07-2011, 02:34 PM
no i read it at school between classes

Ceta
04-08-2011, 08:54 AM
ah...I see. Makes sense. I wish I could do that but I think it'd take forever to complete a book. (In addition to being a slow reader, I don't have a lot of free time to read. D: )

Evil_Cake
04-08-2011, 01:21 PM
ya it does take a long time 2 finish but at least you dont run out of good book

GunZet
04-08-2011, 02:17 PM
Almost done with this
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51fsrYSV6aL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Gonna headbang to some Amon Amarth this last chapter.

Alexander_Hamilton
04-09-2011, 07:08 AM
I am skipping around Thomas Jefferson: A Strange Case of Missing Identity by Alf Mapp. Seems quite good, but he does that thing where he calls Alexander Hamilton a hypocrite for calling Jefferson a wannabe Caeser, because Jefferson said Hamilton said that Caeser was the greatest man in the world. *headdesk*

Zoe
04-13-2011, 10:45 PM
Recently I've read:

1) The Passage by Justin Cronin: My favorite vampire/zombie apocalypse book I've read. Albeit, it's not really a genre that I read often, but it was really well written and I couldn't put it down until I finished it. Unfortunately it's the first in a trilogy, and ends with a cliff hanger, and the next book probably won't be out for at least another year. ;-;

2) Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins: Holy f---, I love these books. They're young adult, but so horrifying. Basically a battle royale type thing, but more awesome.

3) Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bront&#235;: I loved the part about her childhood, but meh. Still going to go see the movie with my sister, though.

4) Be Ready When the Sh*t Goes Down: A Survival Guide to the Apocalypse by Forrest Griffin: lololololol