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toast
08-20-2012, 09:30 PM
Use references, otherwise you will not know what you're doing.

I honestly cannot stress this enough.

I would like to take this time to show you something someone wrote that you need to take into consideration. This is why you need to use a reference in art.


Your mental image library of objects in nature tends to be 'generalized' so your brain can recall it easier. Until you have trained your mind to recall and 'see' things properly, you will draw with what you think they look like.

Basically, why you use reference is so you can draw "what it really is" (what you need to do) vs "what you think it is" (what you are doing right now). Once you practice enough with reference, just start taking reference away.

Putting it into another context, if you are learning a new language and you don't know how to say a specific thought/word, you don't attempt to formulate the word by making it up with what little knowledge you have of the language, right? You save alot more time and energy to just go look the word up.

Psy
08-20-2012, 09:35 PM
God! Listen to this woman. All of you!

Bacon_Barbarian
08-20-2012, 10:56 PM
One could always use references ...

trilokcool3
08-21-2012, 03:59 AM
Ya i totally agree, references are the best source. My art teacher once said that
God gave us eyes so that we can look at a SUBJECT, gave us mind to ANALYSE the subject and hands to draw again again and again till we perfected in the world of arts.
:)

Psy
08-21-2012, 05:25 PM
I want to add to this!
Ok I have seen and read that people think that if you use photo reff it is just "art ganking" and you are less of an artist because you arent good enough or imaginative enough to do it without help. WRONG!!! It is so easy to mess up the anatomy of something you need to use reff. Even with architecture. To use it all effectively tho you need to understand perspective and proportions to tho. But just because you used reff doesn't make it good. If you just want to try and recreate something that's fine but the real point and fun of it is to make your own. Add new clothes or scenery or take things away. Change the expression or put your OC in the pose. Possibilities are endless when you think about it.

And when you can't find the pose or reff you need make your own. There's millions of people out there that will pose for a photo if you ask. Tell your friend or family member to strike a pose and snap a few shots for some personal reff. You can even be your own model. Just remember that if it feels uncomfortable it will probably look uncomfortable and unrealistic.

eltoroguaco
08-22-2012, 08:00 PM
what about fantasy then? If you are to draw something that do not exist. How do you reference that?

JJJorgie
08-22-2012, 08:04 PM
You can combine the anatomy of humans and animals or animals and other animals in an infinite amount of ways. References don't necessarily have to be something you copy down line by line.

eltoroguaco
08-22-2012, 08:06 PM
that goes for living. But what about not living objects? If you're creative enough to invent something you cannot mix by different pictures.

Evil_Cake
08-22-2012, 08:09 PM
ya u can

JJJorgie
08-22-2012, 08:10 PM
Like what, give an example.

You can always find perspective grids and basic shape references that you can combine to build something new.

eltoroguaco
08-22-2012, 09:01 PM
We humans do that because we cannot imagine something out of our world. why aliens on sci-fi movies always reminds of mixed by crawlers, reptiles and sea creatures as well as humans. Yet, there are some that can invent new stuff that is not connected to something else. The radio is an example of that. same goes for the satelites and the light bulb. I am sure there is more great inventors out there that can imagine something out of our world. Sadly, I am not one of them. My inventions can always be related to other stuff we already know of.

Iori
08-22-2012, 09:51 PM
We humans do that because we cannot imagine something out of our world. why aliens on sci-fi movies always reminds of mixed by crawlers, reptiles and sea creatures as well as humans. Yet, there are some that can invent new stuff that is not connected to something else. The radio is an example of that. same goes for the satelites and the light bulb. I am sure there is more great inventors out there that can imagine something out of our world. Sadly, I am not one of them. My inventions can always be related to other stuff we already know of.


Those inventions are new applications for things already existing, aren't they?


A drawing that seems totally different than what's been done before is just a new way order of combining the old shapes and techniques.




On topic:


Nice PSA, Now maybe I can feel less rushed to be able to draw really well with no reference.

ClockHand
08-22-2012, 10:08 PM
on the mater of creating, unless we change our brain structure and reality, we are mostly unable to create something completely new. The new creations as cellphones, satellites, etc, are more solutions for a problem which was already bond to our realities in that moment. Even more, its interesting how in different times design of different objects were related to the aspiration goals of that time, by example 70s cars which many start adopting a "spaceship" shape the more climatic was getting the space campaign on sending a man to the moon.

Demonfyre
08-22-2012, 11:07 PM
Also on top of what ClockHand said, a lot of techniques and technologies are developed from old methods or technologies, they are just made from something that already existed prior to but with a different use and as Iori put it, they just change the way it's ordered and get a different function

Fenn
08-22-2012, 11:35 PM
I was thinking "blah blah references" throughout the whole OP like usual, until the learning a language metaphor came up. It completely changed my view, in a good way!


We humans do that because we cannot imagine something out of our world. why aliens on sci-fi movies always reminds of mixed by crawlers, reptiles and sea creatures as well as humans. Yet, there are some that can invent new stuff that is not connected to something else. The radio is an example of that. same goes for the satelites and the light bulb. I am sure there is more great inventors out there that can imagine something out of our world. Sadly, I am not one of them. My inventions can always be related to other stuff we already know of.

Even if the creation cannot be referenced, the basic shapes and textures can. Everything is made up of basic shapes when you break it down, and I highly doubt you plan on imagining and drawing a texture that does not exist on this planet.

Psy
08-22-2012, 11:47 PM
Function is a good word to build on for this question. For a light bulb or a satalite it's shape and design are dictated by functionality. Cellphones aren't round because that would be awkward to hold and not functional. There probably were not models to go off of for these ideas so ones needed to be create out of the blue. Everything has basically been created so the only thing you can do now is to build on what is there now. Make it smaller make it bigger make it more functional. I can make a phone that creates a hologram of the keys or what ever and have it mounted to your wrist. That doesn't exist but the closest thing I can think of to this would be a watch so that would be my base and I would add to it till I get what I want.

So it's pretty much impossible to get an "original" idea that isint inspired by something else. That's perfectly fine. Avatar the last air bender is totally unique IMO but it is inspired by so many things and some are cliche but it's pulled off in a great way. It's how you add to it that makes it original and yours.

eltoroguaco
08-23-2012, 09:51 AM
Well as you said, everything we make is based on what we already know. Well then, if we do this by default, why do we need reference?

Demonfyre
08-23-2012, 10:33 AM
Well as you said, everything we make is based on what we already know. Well then, if we do this by default, why do we need reference?

Isn't it because our brain isn't very good at piecing what we know or imagine together into a coherent image making it difficult to put it onto paper or onto the screen, but after many studies and lots of practice from reference this ability becomes stronger and eventually leads to the ability to just know where things in space should be. Something like that I think.

eltoroguaco
08-23-2012, 10:57 AM
well... I look at pictures, animals, surroundings outside my window and whatnot every day and I pay good attention to how things is placed and works. I use those as my ref. I look at them daily and remember them for then to draw from my memory. I doesn't use the reference beside my art and draw straight from it. It's not that I disagree on references themselves, but I disagree on how to use them.

Demonfyre
08-23-2012, 11:03 AM
Personally I just feel that by not having a reference physically there, i'm increasing the chances for my brain to misunderstand a placement or the proportions and end with a larger mistake than when I had what ever the reference was physically there, in whatever form. Obviously this is my problem that I need to get around, you will have your own set and as you are much more experienced they are also probably very different, but just keep it in mind.

Psy
08-23-2012, 02:18 PM
Well as you said, everything we make is based on what we already know. Well then, if we do this by default, why do we need reference?


No I said everything has basically already been created. Can you draw the human skeleton for me right now? No reference. I want it detailed and labeled.
You don't have to use reference at all if you dont want to. But that also means that you have to accept that your work will allways have flaws and be wrong. People will see it and point it out because maybe they have seen what it really looks like enough times to know.
To tell some one "No I ment for it to be that way because that's how I pictured it in my mind." would be extremely arrogant of an artist. Yet it's exactly how an artist that uses no reference will respond. Childish and delusional.

You can draw the human heart 1000 times with no reffrences but that doesnt mean it will ever be accurate or believable.

Rubisko
08-23-2012, 03:07 PM
http://i1150.photobucket.com/albums/o608/jenbe753/referenceisforlosers.png

(but seriosly, DO use reference. It's kick-ass)

eltoroguaco
08-23-2012, 03:15 PM
I only use reference if I'm in doubt. And to your part and I quote
To tell some one "No I ment for it to be that way because that's how I pictured it in my mind." would be extremely arrogant of an artist. Yet it's exactly how an artist that uses no reference will respond. Is not always right. As for me as an example, I rarely to never use reference but I NEVER brag about own arts or claim it's as I imagined. I never get it as I imagined either, with or without reference. I believe really few or no artists can do that. Reference can be good if you know how to use it. But there are so many that pick a picture on google and draw straight from it! Lets say if one were to draw a girl in a black dress. He google it and find a picture of a girl with red hair sitting on her knee in a black dress and scars in her face. He use it as a ref and draws the exact same girl in the exact same dress with the exact same pose. That is NOT the artistic way of using refs! If you are to use a ref, use it to see how the anatomy, objects , surroundings and cloths look like, and respond to physics. For then to draw what you originally imagined without it being the same as in the pictures. As for me, I spend 2 years drawing Dragons. At first, I didn't use refs at all, but later realized my anatomy was wrong so I needed some. I then looked up at some pictures and practised on some body parts for then to close it and draw what I imagined. Later I got other things to help me. I have dragon statues on my desk and I looked at my dogs to see some animal anatomy. I also often look out the window to see weather, trees and skies and I look at moving surroundings from my car. So yes, I use reference, but I only look on it til I remember it and draw from my memory and not from the picture.

Wow this became a wall of text, but at least I think I've said my point now.

ClockHand
08-23-2012, 04:30 PM
I didn't want to comment, but this is funny.


I only use reference if I'm in doubt. And to your part and I quote Is not always right. As for me as an example, I rarely to never use reference but I NEVER brag about own arts or claim it's as I imagined. I never get it as I imagined either, with or without reference.

Weird, most artist get things as they imagined, even when people try new techniques, but as they have the bases, they can make it as they imagined. Maybe your problem is that you haven't used enough references and neither have focused on real human being anatomy.


Reference can be good if you know how to use it. But there are so many that pick a picture on google and draw straight from it! Lets say if one were to draw a girl in a black dress. He google it and find a picture of a girl with red hair sitting on her knee in a black dress and scars in her face. He use it as a ref and draws the exact same girl in the exact same dress with the exact same pose. That is NOT the artistic way of using refs!

Which is the "artistic" use of references? Artist have been doing that for centuries, so saying "is not the artistic way" is a bold proposition, please back it up. I do agree that references are not just "look and copy", that there are other things to take from it, but references help as they create a memory catalog on your head of poses, techniques and principles; they are the complete application of almost everything you see on theoretic drawing.


As for me, I spend 2 years drawing Dragons. At first, I didn't use refs at all, but later realized my anatomy was wrong so I needed some.

How is possible that something that doesn't exist has a wrong anatomy? Did you went to look real dragons or something?


I have dragon statues on my desk and I looked at my dogs to see some animal anatomy.

Dragon statues made by people who used dragon's as references? A dog with real dragon anatomy? The big deal with mythical creatures is that you can do what ever you want with them in anatomy, but we still use references of animals because they are the most related to what these creatures are supposed to look, and also because we have no way to create something out of our reality. This makes mythical creatures 100% based on references, and if you don't use references, be ready to make mythical creatures that look like a 3 years old kid draw with crayons.


One of the funny things is that you nag people on using references and then you accept the fact you also use references, but you just use them at 1/4 of its potential.

eltoroguaco
08-23-2012, 04:41 PM
I don't nag it, I just don't like copying. On arts that is done like that in the past, like Mona lisa, it's meant to be that exact person or place, so then ofc refs is required and they pose to be painted. In all, the poser agrees to be painted. I think that copying a reference you find on the internet, especially if it's of a person, is as bad as stealing the picture. as the person on the photo or the owner of the original picture have not agreed on you drawing it. However if you only use the anatomy or the base of the objects or surroundings, you do not copy the art and therefore make it more original and own as well as not stealing something you do not own the rights of. No matter what you say, I will only use references to see the base and anatomy unless it's a person I'm about to draw and got the rights to draw them. Though even then, I'll change the pose and clothing (as for the draw an mt member thread).

GunZet
08-23-2012, 04:47 PM
I rarely use references, but I collect a ton of them just in case.

JJJorgie
08-23-2012, 04:52 PM
There's a difference between referencing a picture and stealing it. References are use for anatomy, to see how clothing falls a certain way, shading, etc. It's fine to copy a picture for education purposes, as long as you don't say it's your own idea and/or credit the original artist. Stealing art (what you're talking about, Guaco) is copying a picture AND saying that it's yours.

toast
08-23-2012, 04:56 PM
I rarely to never use reference
I don't understand why you don't, though. You have problems in your art which could easily be fixed if you sat down and practiced, and looked at various photos of humans studying facial structure, bone structure, movement, hands, legs, feet, etc. If you said this to a professional artist who's been doing studies and practicing his whole life, he'd laugh at you. Again, you do not know what you're doing until you actually sit down and look at it.


But there are so many that pick a picture on google and draw straight from it! Lets say if one were to draw a girl in a black dress. He google it and find a picture of a girl with red hair sitting on her knee in a black dress and scars in her face. He use it as a ref and draws the exact same girl in the exact same dress with the exact same pose. That is NOT the artistic way of using refs!
?? Who are you to judge how someone uses this ref and if or if not its an artistic way? If this guy is practicing dynamic poses with clothed people, and interesting atmospheres, good for him for actually practicing. This is the best way to practice, apart from having a live model. I understand if he's just shittily drawing/tracing this and saying it's his own, but that's not what any of us are talking about so I'm not sure the point in bringing it up.


If you are to use a ref, use it to see how the anatomy, objects , surroundings and cloths look like, and respond to physics.
THEN WHY DONT YOU USE A REFERENCE?

As for me, I spend 2 years drawing Dragons. At first, I didn't use refs at all, but later realized my anatomy was wrong so I needed some.
Lol

I then looked up at some pictures and practised on some body parts for then to close it and draw what I imagined. Later I got other things to help me. I have dragon statues on my desk and I looked at my dogs to see some animal anatomy. I also often look out the window to see weather, trees and skies and I look at moving surroundings from my car. So yes, I use reference, but I only look on it til I remember it and draw from my memory and not from the picture.

Lol but you never actually sit down and make a study off of these. I don't see any sketches of your surroundings. You can't just memorize these things. You have to actually sit down and look at them, take pictures and draw in your sketch book. If you were totally serious about being able to draw a dragon, you would go far in your studies. You would look up a ton of references of reptiles, or if you like, go to a zoo. Or if you're hardcore, catch a reptile with your teeth and lay its body on your desk as you sketch it. You would understand that dogs =/= dragons and you may even go as far as trying to compare reptiles and mammals. You would study up on scales as well and the texture, so that your dragons will look more believable. You'd also maybe go back to understanding how lighting and shading works because dragon art tends to have dramatic, dark lighting. You would also figure out the size of the traditional dragon compared to a human. And if you're still having troubles with scales and texture, you'd fill up a few pages of just practicing being able to draw scales. And if you're still having problems with the proportions of a dragon, maybe you're having trouble with proportions in general, so you go back to basic proportions and maybe study up on some loomis and look for techniques.

Don't tell me you studied dragons. You didn't. You barely tried. You looked at a few pictures and bought a cheap statue and said K i'm ready

For everyone else, here's a way to learn from a study. Watch the whole thing

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nyjnB1PimA


I don't nag it, I just don't like copying. On arts that is done like that in the past, like Mona lisa, it's meant to be that exact person or place, so then ofc refs is required and they pose to be painted. In all, the poser agrees to be painted. I think that copying a reference you find on the internet, especially if it's of a person, is as bad as stealing the picture. as the person on the photo or the owner of the original picture have not agreed on you drawing it. However if you only use the anatomy or the base of the objects or surroundings, you do not copy the art and therefore make it more original and own as well as not stealing something you do not own the rights of. No matter what you say, I will only use references to see the base and anatomy unless it's a person I'm about to draw and got the rights to draw them. Though even then, I'll change the pose and clothing (as for the draw an mt member thread).

You don't understand the point of a reference and I don't think you understand that no art is original. If you think tracing is the same as sketching a pose from a photograph, please turn in your artist badge.

Psy
08-23-2012, 05:02 PM
I think any person that is serious about their art and not looking to make it stylized so it looks completely cartoony would use reference. Even in learning anatomy you look at references. So yea like I said you dont have to use reff but you won't become as good as you could if you did. Just seems like an awful lot of time to waste guessing instead of learning and knowing.

Totally well said 3J

GunZet
08-23-2012, 05:08 PM
Learning to use ref and using it right so that it suits you is definitely a skill to have, though I wouldn't say it's an absolute necessary thing to become a great artist. Same thing with drawing from life.

ClockHand
08-23-2012, 05:10 PM
I don't nag it, I just don't like copying.

It's okay, just don't get upset if things do not end as you imagine.


I think that copying a reference you find on the internet, especially if it's of a person, is as bad as stealing the picture.

So if I copy a reference of an apple I see on the market I'm stealing the apple? Look, this is why I'm okay with artist copying each other styles or poses, its because art is in it principle "copy based", we started at copying what we could see, and with time we learned to manipulate that to make it what we want to be. And with more time I learned from those people who did that to start exploiting qualities we want of those drawings. Art is build on copying, this is how we made little steps on developing art, just look at modern street art, it is just a filtered version of pop art and design on the most part.


as the person on the photo or the owner of the original picture have not agreed on you drawing it.

Following the same idea, if every person would be like that we would be sinking art. The whole deal in art is to copy as a base of progression, we copy, we might not do big changes, other people might do very bold changes, but the fact is, we copy, and with every copy we make progressions or at least changes. If people start being like "I don't agree with others using my work for their improvement" we are just going to sink.


However if you only use the anatomy or the base of the objects or surroundings, you do not copy the art and therefore make it more original and own as well as not stealing something you do not own the rights of.

You can still copy the whole thing and say "it is based of X opus, made by Y". It's not stealing if you recognize the source and you don't recognize the authority of the work. I think you have things mixed, stealing art is when you basically take something from someone else and take complete authority over the work, using references is just copying what you see with out authority over the image.


No matter what you say, I will only use references to see the base and anatomy unless it's a person I'm about to draw and got the rights to draw them. Though even then, I'll change the pose and clothing (as for the draw an mt member thread).

I don't want you to change, I don't even care. This is just too funny to let it go.

eltoroguaco
08-23-2012, 05:22 PM
the whole stealing part is for people that copy the exact character! Say, if someone were to draw my dragon and claim it as his, I'd be really damn pissed! However, if he just use the pose or the dragons anatomy, I'd not mind it. It only counts if they draw another person's character without permission.

JJJorgie
08-23-2012, 05:28 PM
So... are you changing your opinion? Because you just said that copying a picture as a reference is stealing art.

Demonfyre
08-23-2012, 05:33 PM
Everything we learn in life is based off of references in effect. For example, how do I learn biology? Well I pick up a book (a biology reference) written by somebody and I learn what the author has written by essentially going over and mimicing his understanding by what he has wrote so that I can have that same understanding. If he has written crap then I learn crap, similar to references. You are using a picture drawn by somebody that knows what they are doing to learn yourself.

Back to the biology example, if I was to use that information I had just learnt in a debate then would that be 'copying'? No it wouldn't, it would be me applying what I learnt for a logical use and also going over that information to further remember it, just like when referencing in art so I can begin to learn techniques or how the body is in different positions. However if I were to then say, all that information I worked out independantly and using my own inginuity. That would then be stealing, as the information was not researched or discovered by me.

I can't think of any better way to say that there is a large difference between copying/stealing and using it to improve. That should also show that everything involved in a learning process involves using references and mimicing somebody else's knowledge, whether that is from a book, the Internet or even a picture.

eltoroguaco
08-23-2012, 06:43 PM
So... are you changing your opinion? Because you just said that copying a picture as a reference is stealing art.

Not changing my mind. I just rephrased it. I didn't mean that everything you copy is stealth. Only what is copyrighted. So Characters done by others.

toast
08-23-2012, 06:54 PM
Not changing my mind. I just rephrased it. I didn't mean that everything you copy is stealth. Only what is copyrighted. So Characters done by others.

except..when we speak about references, we mean photo references. To help you learn. This thread isn't about copying naruto to help you learn how to draw naruto

eltoroguaco
08-23-2012, 06:55 PM
yeah I know. it kinda went out of track there xD

Fenn
08-23-2012, 08:10 PM
So we can finish this and get back on track, copying becomes stealing when one of two things happen:
1. The artists copies an original drawing and claims the idea as their own, without givin any credit to the original (not sure if it's illegal, but if discovered it ruins the copier's reputation).
2. Someone makes any drawing of a copyrighted image AND sells it for profit or uses it in any sort of commercial manner (definitely illegal).

Just wanted to clarify.

CypressDahlia
08-23-2012, 09:57 PM
Artists have gotten into the habit of copying pictures to the tee without citing the fact that they used a reference. Don't do that. By doing that you are taking credit for a level of skill you do not possess.

Aside from that, feel free to use references. Photomashing is also good practice. A lot of concept artists photomash a bunch of different, yet related objects to create a larger image. Like throwing together engine and train parts to create a mech. I might make a photomashing tutorial.

GunZet
08-23-2012, 11:07 PM
Relating to the above

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGWMgXlKFHc&list=FLD8uHCgHA0kkXInCke6kzQg&index=9&feature=plpp_video

Rio
08-28-2012, 12:55 PM
Re photomashing>
Just be careful about the photos you mash together. If they're randomly taken from Google search, then the photo's have a good chance of being copyrighted and not for you to use commercially (or even for your hobby technically).

eltoroguaco
08-28-2012, 02:30 PM
What I've been saying all along :P

Rio
08-28-2012, 05:49 PM
Using something that isn't yours to create a something that is the same medium as the source is one thing versus using something that isn't yours as a reference to generate a new artwork completely different from the medium of the source is quite another. :|

photo => photo =/= photo => pencil drawing

For example, if one person has a photo of Lady Liberty, takes that and makes a collage with other photos - that's not really his art. That photo is copyrighted to the original person who took that photo. If another person has a photo of Lady Liberty, uses it as reference and creates a painting out of it - that is acceptable.

eltoroguaco
08-28-2012, 05:57 PM
yes xD Still stating my point.
Drawing something entirely from a reference photo count as stealing if what's on the photo is copyrighted.
Drawing something not from a photo, but used the photo to see the anatomy/structure, is not stealing as it's not the same object/creatures.

GunZet
08-28-2012, 06:20 PM
I agree mostly with what's being said, but there are certain things that can't be stolen from reference, even if you copy it down to the 1st degree. For example, a pose. You can't copyright a pose last time I checked, though I may be wrong, and if that were the case, you'd be sued for sitting with your fist on your chin while you drop a deuce.
Basically, it's the details that are often copyrighted. If you're smart, you'll never have to worry about any of this stuff, because you wont be thinking about whether or not you should add in that same piece of armor that your reference is wearing on your own piece.

eltoroguaco
08-28-2012, 06:54 PM
True poses cannot be copyrighted. Some kind of clothing can, but then it must be unique for a character or made for a fashion show.

Btw, this:
and if that were the case, you'd be sued for sitting with your fist on your chin while you drop a deuce.
Made me laugh.

toast
08-29-2012, 04:06 PM
ugh you guys are making this all too complicated and taking the word "stealing" too far. If you are doing a photo study and you state the reference, you are not stealing. It doesn't matter if you photomash, only use a photo for it's structure, or just draw every detail from the photo. There is no wrong way to use a reference image, as long as you make sure you either 1. state the reference if you're copying the whole thing or 2. use the reference loosely

When it comes to references, if you're tracing and then trying to sell your work, that's against the law. If you steal the design for pikachu and just change the colors, then sell trading cards of him, that's against the law. But honestly if it's just for personal use, no one's going to call the cops on you. It reminds me of how my teacher keeps saying that it's against copyright if we include some trademark in our our sketchbook art?? Sure it may be uncreative but it's not against the law, it's fucking school work.

Anyways, I think photomashups are totally fine as long as you at least state your reference I guess. But then I don't think it matters that much if you didn't trace. You're not selling the actual photoshopped mashup or something, theres a reason it's made as a reference. All you did was put together your ideas and thoughts so that you can better picture what your piece is going to look like. Now, if you're going to completely copy down every detail of the photomashup, it's better to post the reference because otherwise it's just kind of sleazy. But if you're just using it to see the structure of your piece, where you're going to put things, what the pose would look like in the environment, what the color scheme may be, the general idea, etc, then whatever. Do what you want. Who cares.

nisaren
09-01-2012, 09:46 PM
I couldn't agree with this thread more. I think most of the time people don't use a reference because they are too lazy to bother trying to find one. Looking for references eats into the time that you could be spending drawing but it's almost always very worth it. I thought I'd post up a couple videos from one of my favorite concept artists about how and why he uses references and he also discusses what types of references he finds the most useful. Some of the video may not apply to what we want to do, but there are general concepts in there that are important. Mainly his focus on understanding the subject of your studies rather than just drawing straight from the photo.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIUbGJuAxTY&list=UUbdyjrrJAjDIACjCsjAGFAA&index=21&feature=plcp



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKAD5KVPVEw&list=UUbdyjrrJAjDIACjCsjAGFAA&index=20&feature=plcp

The second video he looks at his library of stored images many of which came from the internet as well as other sites. Mind you, this guy's livelihood depends on his "originality" and designs.

I really think that people go a little crazy with worry over copyright. That doesn't mean it's ok to blatantly rip off other people's work, but to think you need to worry about copying a pose from a photo is a bit paranoid.

Lastly and most importantly... here's his video about building your own personal "Visual Library" which is hugely important, especially if you want to design things that aren't real but still look like they could exist.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnflBERf2zM&list=UUbdyjrrJAjDIACjCsjAGFAA&index=6&feature=plcp