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butternut
01-07-2011, 10:38 AM
Can anyone suggest tutorials on perspective? I really suck at it, so i have a lot of problem with drawing backgrounds. I did check out a few techniques and such, but i just dont seem to get the hang of it. Rarely i get it perfectly, but i need to work more. Please help!

Electric_Nomad
01-07-2011, 11:05 AM
I believe you can find some on youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UP9x1322dK8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3Nv3SrtQuk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=felys-u4nfk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0iOSjRm0Rkw

Regantor
01-10-2011, 11:18 AM
It doesn't exactly help that alot of those methods are hugely overcomplicated IMO... If you are still having trouble, what I personaly suggest is simply practicing drawing a few cubes in differant positions. It's also very important to think of your page as a "camera", as the ceiling often looks smaller than the floor inside of a building, for instance. Try thinking of your "camera" sitting around weird angles within that cube. Three dimensional thinking is very handy indeed. :o

Is there anything majorly specific you have trouble with? I don't mind handing out more specific advice...

Electric_Nomad
01-10-2011, 01:36 PM
Is there anything majorly specific you have trouble with? I don't mind handing out more specific advice...
(Hey man, It's DDX here... if you remember... that is)
I am having trouble doing a perspective drawing with organic matters. Like trees and humans and etc. That and plus the foreshortning.

butternut
01-10-2011, 01:37 PM
well, as to drawing few cubes in different positions - that's pretty simple. The real trouble is when i have to draw different objects, say a cycle, for example, complicated objects is what i have a problem with. I can draw stuff with straight lines like rooms, or boxes and stuff like that easily. I can't draw it unless i have some reference or a picture of that object in that angle there.

Regantor
01-10-2011, 04:08 PM
Hum. Well, the hardest part of foreshortening is that things often look wonky on their own, but fine as a complete image; Take this (http://www.freewebs.com/handcannon/REG10ObsP009DigitalFormat.jpg) page for example.

The only thing really stopping that pistol arm in the bottom panel from looking odd is that it's clearly defined by the rest of the image. This is what I meant by "camera".

Sometimes it just helps to draw the furthest thing, then the closest thing, then focus all your foreshortening efforts on the stuff that attaches the two togeather. Sometimes things don't look right just because their isn't enough detail on the nearest thing; Shading helps big time.

Alot of it is just muscle memory and persistance, to be honest.

butternut
01-11-2011, 09:44 AM
hmm..Thanks! I'll try out something and post it soon. =)