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View Full Version : Recommend me fantasy novels (read op or I will karate you)



jubeh
07-10-2011, 11:06 AM
Okay I'm looking for fantasy stuff to read. Here are my things though.

I really don't like magic unless its handled incredibly well. What I mean is magic needs to factor into politics and government for me to take it seriously. If wizards are all powerful but don't control the world for some reason, I just want to know why.

I'm inclined towards more realistic stuff. Like if warhammers are a common weapon but full iron plate hasn't been invented yet, that sort of thing bothers me. Or if dudes are constantly getting hit by arrows that don't hurt them (though I'm more lenient about super human stuff since I love romance of the three kingdoms).

It also helps if the writing is good. I love the lore of lord of the rings but I could barely stomach the books.

Also this should go without saying, but this is not a list thread. I know it's asking for a lot but try to sell me on the books you recommend. And no need to recommend the song of ice and fire books since I'm going to get those eventually.

Blue_Dragon
07-11-2011, 01:29 AM
I really liked The Prydain Chronicles by Lloyd Alexander (Disney really butchered the story when they created "The Black Cauldron." Their version was mildly entertaining, but also an abomination, since it screwed up combining two books--and they just omitted characters and made crap up.)

You may also like the Dresden Series by Jim Butcher, or anything by Terry Pratchett, as he is very funny. I thoroughly enjoyed Going Postal.

I have more, but I'm too lazy to add more suggestions.

Fenn
07-11-2011, 10:47 AM
The Ranger's Apprentice series is aimed at a slightly younger audience, but I found it quite entertaining.

The author did his homework regarding swordplay; he describes and analyzes the action in a very cool, detailed way. The character dialogue is, to me, one of the most believeable I've read in almost any genre, and the characters are quite memorable, and even though there are plenty of cliches (orphaned protagonist, emotionless master, evil "dark lord"), after the first two books they develop and grow out of these cliches (master is actually far more complex, and *minor spoiler* the evil lord dies at the hands of someone unexpected *end spoiler*).

There's some suspension of disbelief but it works. The Rangers, who the hero becomes a part of and trains with, seem to have unrealistic stealth and archery skills, but since it does not take place on Earth, and the author provides a bit of explanation of how these skills work, it's rather acceptable. All in all it's a rather believeable and exciting series with a fast pace and good writing, plenty of action, and political intrigue. Even the slight bit of romance is down-to-earth and more sensible. The hero is yong and naive; the older characters romance in subtle and defensive ways through witty wordplay.

As a last note magic does appear much later in the series, I don't remember it too well, but it's not all-powerful. In fact, I think a lot of it is well-masked presdigitation.

Byakuran
07-11-2011, 06:33 PM
Twillight.

DrPumpkin
07-12-2011, 10:12 AM
...or anything by Terry Pratchett, as he is very funny. I thoroughly enjoyed Going Postal....

This.

Terry Pratchett is very fun. Going Postal's good but so is Guards! Guards!. Both are very good to sink your teeth into.

Read. Naow.

jubeh
07-12-2011, 04:46 PM
Thanks for the recommendations.

Btw I hate when people use sayings and adjectives that are used to describe food when talking about things. Why would I sink my teeth into a book the thought actually makes me upset. Like I'm pissed right now. Im raging.

Fenn
07-12-2011, 09:28 PM
Thanks for the recommendations.

Btw I hate when people use sayings and adjectives that are used to describe food when talking about things. Why would I sink my teeth into a book the thought actually makes me upset. Like I'm pissed right now. Im raging.

Reader's Digest must really make you angry.

Delphinus
07-13-2011, 07:37 AM
But culinary metaphors are delectable. There's nothing like a nice side of figurative language referring to the utterly mouth-watering qualities of a book, and likewise there's nothing wrong with describing dry, bitter, and difficult to consume books using metaphors that disdain the full poisonous flavour of their writing.

Harvester_Of_Sorrow
07-13-2011, 12:51 PM
Chronicles of Conan. Enough said.

Or you could try American Gods by Neil Gaiiman (Sandman guy). I can't really give a review cause I havent read it myself yet. My brother got it for me for my birthday and keeps saying how awesome it is. I won't start it until I've finished Motorcycle Diaries then Don Juan. When I start a book I finish that motherfucker!

Delphinus
07-13-2011, 01:04 PM
American Gods is a great book. I read it in like 3 days.

Blue_Dragon
07-15-2011, 01:53 AM
^I like Neil Gaiman books. :) Stardust was good (I got a beautiful copy that was illustrated by Charles Ves, I like it better than the movie, though the movie was all right. Read the book first, if you do it at all.)



Edit: Good Omens was pretty funny, too. :)

DrPumpkin
07-15-2011, 03:05 AM
Good Omens is Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchet together so it has to be added to all reading lists.

Rio
07-15-2011, 03:00 PM
Monster Blood Tattoo series by D.M. Cornish
The book is set in a unique world and it's very well made; very much like Lord of the Rings where it has a highly detailed world including terms, societies, etc. (It has it's own dictionary and appendixes in the back of each book with illustrations on how people look, maps, etc) It's about a young orphan named Rossamund, a boy unfortunately given a girl's name, who becomes a lamplighter and his adventures. I wasn't so wild with the first book but stick with it and it ends well (I'm talking about all three books).

Pellinor series by Alison Croggen (The Gift, The Riddle, The Crow, and The Singing)
Another world that is highly detailed. A slave girl meets her destiny as she escapes to freedom with a bard (they're like wizards really). She apparently has the gift that all bards have and the story moves from there.

Atherton series by Patrick Carman (House of Power, Rivers of Fire, The Dark Planet)
It's about a boy who lives in a world that is a tier. The bottom tier are full of monsters and is the wasteland, the middle tier is for the average folks who farm and work, and the upper tier is for the "lords" who rule and decide the fate of the nation, so to speak. The boy knows there's more to his life than just working and he's been slowly climbing the wall that separates his world and the world of the "nobles". Ok, this book starts off as fantasy but moves into science fiction but stick with it and it's pretty cool. At least in imo. <_<

The Last Apprentice series by Joseph Delaney
A horror fantasy series - it's about a seventh son of a seventh son who apprentices to become a Spook, someone who fights anything that goes bump in the night. Most of the enemies are witches but there are other interesting monsters as well.

There's some other books but I'll leave off on them for now. C:

Psy
07-16-2011, 01:02 AM
http://thebooksmugglers.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/AbhorsenTrilogy.jpg

The old kingdom series (Abhorsen series/trilogy for us in north america) by Garth Nix. I loved the lore of it as well as how structured the magic is. It jumps between diffrent characters points of views and slightly tangent story lines that eventually come back to the main plot so you are sometimes juggling info.
Allso not sure if it counts but i will put it in a spoiler tag anyhow.
Its about necromancy and Necromancers are just awesome and the books further prove that. The magic is given limitation which makes it more realistic but still with the fun of it being somthing not totally naturally occuring. The things done with the necromancy are things i had never imagined or thought of and enjoyed allot to read. The world is detailed imo but i may have a diffrent idea of detailed than most (sometimes lacking >>).
in order books are Sabriel, Lirael and Abhorsen. Seriously check it out as its sure to please.

Rio
07-16-2011, 11:15 AM
Yeah, I really like how the world is set up in the series. I've only had a chance to read Sabriel but I really liked it. Ranger's Apprentice was not bad too. Personally, I would've liked it if there were more details to sink your teeth into but you have to read the series to get more information/more of the world. Thumbs up to Llyod Alexander too - the main character starts off as annoying imo (snot-nosed kid!) but he really shapes out in the end.

Speaking of which - I just remembered a pretty interesting title: The Riddle-Master of Hed by Patricia A. McKillip. Another well-thought out world:
The Riddle-Master of the title is Morgon, the Prince of Hed, a small, simple island populated by farmers and swineherds. He has three stars on his forehead, which no one has been able to explain. As the book opens, his sister, Tristan, discovers that he is keeping a crown hidden under his bed, and he must explain that he won it in a riddle-game with a ghost, the cursed king Peven of Aum.

When Deth, the High One's harpist, finds out, he explains that another king, Mathom of An, has pledged to marry his daughter Raederle to the man who wins that crown from the ghost.

Morgon sets forth to claim his bride accompanied by Deth, but while at sea, his ship is sunk by mysterious shapechangers. Shipwrecked, Morgon loses his memory and the power of speech. When Deth finally finds him again, and he recovers his memory and speaking ability, he resolves to travel to ask the High One about the shapechangers. The High One's home, located in the far north on Erlenstar Mountain, is seldom visited. As Morgon and Deth travel the length of the realm, they are repeatedly attacked by the shapechangers, and Morgon learns more and more dangerous knowledge about his three stars and the great powers that come with them.

Arashi500
07-16-2011, 12:32 PM
Like Fenn, I recommend atleast the first 4 books in The Ranger's Apprentice series (the writing and consistency drops pretty staggeringly between books 5-6 which are two-parters so i don't recommend book 5.

I'd also recommend The Night Angel trilogy by Brent Weeks(it's sorta likeong of ice and fire but with MUCH more magic) and his new series Lightbringer(only one book so far, but the most powerful Drafter, the term for mages in the series is the nigh-omnipotent ruler of the world, so your political bits of magiucal taste should be satisfied.)

Also, I don't know if you'd be into it, but the Temeraire series is a magic-less Historical fantasy that can be summed up as the Napoleonic Wars but with dragons. And they work essentially as sentient, flying calvalry.

jubeh
07-16-2011, 01:01 PM
Napoleonic wars eh

Rio
07-16-2011, 01:41 PM
I'd also recommend The Night Angel trilogy by Brent Weeks(it's sorta likeong of ice and fire but with MUCH more magic) and his new series Lightbringer(only one book so far, but the most powerful Drafter, the term for mages in the series is the nigh-omnipotent ruler of the world, so your political bits of magiucal taste should be satisfied.)Aaaaah. This series. Not recommended for the week stomached (gore and real social issues like prostitutes and other things are touched upon here). Liked the first book. The hero was a real dork in the second. Have yet to read the third but I hope it gets better. :>

Aether
07-17-2011, 04:10 AM
Read Magician by Raymond E. Feist.
It's set in a world where common magical use is still in it's infancy, then there's an invasion from another world where magic is commonplace. There's a lot of war and stuff and it's really awesome, especially when the Prince is helped by a thieve's guild to escape the clutches of a mad King and a Baron that is looking to take the throne for himself. By the way, there's some magic use, but it's not all over the place.

Arashi500
07-18-2011, 12:54 AM
Aaaaah. This series. Not recommended for the week stomached (gore and real social issues like prostitutes and other things are touched upon here). Liked the first book. The hero was a real dork in the second. Have yet to read the third but I hope it gets better. :>

Yeah he isn't quite as dorky, but the whole idealism vs. duty dilemma becomes a bigger part. He does man up though. The other protagonists also become great characters though. And it's not like NAT has more gore than other big series like Song of Ice and Fire, maybe social issues, but they are handled quite well IMO.


Napoleonic wars eh

Yup. Starts a couple of years after the American revolutionary war, and the protagonist is a British naval officer.

Black_Shaggie
07-24-2011, 08:15 PM
Umm...What's wrong? Nobody here likes J.R.R. Tolkien? You know...The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings?! This guy is a litterary ledgend in the fantasy genre & the books are awesome. Better than the movies in my opinion.

There's also this really cool quartet of books called Journey to the West collectively. There's supposed to be classic chinese literature & were published by some no name person (who probally made a lot of money & bad karma too) in the 1950s. Arthur Waley abridged them, changing the title to Adventures of the Monkey God. It's a fictional account of the journey of a historical monk & his 3 disciples/ protectors. Awesome story I think the movie Forbidden Kingdom was based off of these books.

My personal favorite books are R.A. Salvatore's Dark Elf Trilogy & The Icewind Dale Trilogy If you've ever played Dungeons & Dragons (which I proudly have most of my life), then you've more than likely heard the name Drizzt Do'Urden. These books all feature him as the main protagonist & both triologies show how the use of magic directly effect politics very well. Besides, Drizzt is the baddest of bad *bleep!* ever to use two swords.

I tend to ramble...so I'll stop here.

jubeh
07-24-2011, 08:18 PM
Most of them probably knew I had already read tolkien. Did journey to the west (abridged) and I really dont like salvatore but thanks for the suggestions regardless.

Edit; You know its been like 10 years probably gonna reread journey to the west anyway thanks for bringing it up

Black_Shaggie
07-24-2011, 08:24 PM
No problem. A lot of people think he's a goof ^_^. Uhh...try this one though: Fall Into Darkness by Nicholas Yersmakov. Old book that's full of a lot of political intruige. Kind of Sci Fi (there futuristic humans on another planet) but a fantasy.

jubeh
07-26-2011, 04:37 PM
Hm okay my library didn't have a lot of the stuff you guys mentioned. I managed to pick up the name of the wind and sabriel.

Rio
07-26-2011, 04:48 PM
Can you get titles through Inter-Library Loan (ILL)? Most libraries are part of a system which shares resources from neighboring libraries.

jubeh
07-26-2011, 05:09 PM
idk

Arashi500
07-26-2011, 08:56 PM
Also by Brent Weeks, he recently released a Novella prologue to The Night Angel trilogy.

The Mortal Instruments series is... okay I guess. A lot like Twilight but MUCH better written and no Mormon brainwashing going on in the sub-text.

Rio
07-26-2011, 09:00 PM
idkWell, go find out man! If they don't have it, just request them. Libraries usually oblige purchasing books for their patrons and adding them to the collection. Be persistent about it too if they don't get it right away.

Delphinus
07-27-2011, 11:29 AM
Umm...What's wrong? Nobody here likes J.R.R. Tolkien? You know...The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings?! This guy is a litterary ledgend in the fantasy genre & the books are awesome. Better than the movies in my opinion.

Hobbit is good. Lord of the Rings is dull. Both have flat characters. Modern fantasy is mostly better.

Rio
07-27-2011, 02:37 PM
The thing that bogs down LoTR is that it goes off into historical references, lore, and tons of background info. Compared to modern fantasy writing which is mainly to the point, it's just a heck of a quagmire to read through.

Delphinus
07-27-2011, 02:58 PM
Exactly. Expositing every ten seconds is not good writing.

Hell, even Candide was easier to read for me, and that was written 300 years ago in French. Though that could just be the skill of the translators.

Fenn
07-28-2011, 12:31 PM
Ever read the Artemis Fowl series?

Rio
08-01-2011, 12:53 PM
Song of the Beast
by Carol Berg
"Aidan MacAllister, cousin of the king of Elyria, was an extraordinary musician. But when he turned 21, the king sentenced him to be imprisoned and silenced on a charge of treason. Now it is 17 years later, and a scarred, voiceless Aidan is released, not knowing exactly why he was sentenced in the first place." He goes in search of the answer to his imprisonment and changes history.

Transformation
by Carol Berg
"Seyonne is a man waiting to die. He has been a slave for sixteen years, almost half his life, and has lost everything of meaning to him: his dignity, the people and homeland he loves, and the Warden's power he used to defend an unsuspecting world from the ravages of demons. Seyonne has made peace with his fate. With strict self-discipline he forces himself to exist only in the present moment and to avoid the pain of hope or caring about anyone. But from the moment he is sold to the arrogant, careless Prince Aleksander, the heir to the Derzhi Empire, Seyonne's uneasy peace begins to crumble. And when he discovers a demon lurking in the Derzhi court, he must find hope and strength in a most unlikely place..."

This one is part of a trilogy. Haven't had a chance to read the other two yet.

You may also like James A. Owen. His first book Here, There Be Dragons is about fantasy authors who become caretakers of a world but not just any world - a world where dragons, fairies, and everything fantastical may be found. It's very interesting in that it deals with fantasy but real-world issues during that time period as well.

Hamachi
08-04-2011, 02:34 PM
Guards! Guards! by Terry Pratchett
"Here there be dragons...and the denizens of Ankh-Morpork wish one huge firebreather would return from whence it came. Long believed extinct, a superb specimen of draco nobilis ("noble dragon" for those who don't understand italics) has appeared in Discworld's greatest city. Not only does this unwelcome visitor have a nasty habit of charbroiling everything in its path, in rather short order it is crowned King (it is a noble dragon, after all...)."
More of a fantasy satire than anything. Highly recommend starting the Discworld series here.

The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss
"Kvothe ("pronounced nearly the same as 'Quothe' "), the hero and villain of a thousand tales who's presumed dead, lives as the simple proprietor of the Waystone Inn under an assumed name. Prompted by a biographer called Chronicler who realizes his true identity, Kvothe starts to tell his life story. From his upbringing as an actor in his family's traveling troupe of magicians, jugglers and jesters, the Edema Ruh, to feral child on the streets of the vast port city of Tarbean, then his education at "the University," Kvothe is driven by twin imperatives—his desire to learn the higher magic of naming and his need to discover as much as possible about the Chandrian, the demons of legend who murdered his family. As absorbing on a second reading as it is on the first, this is the type of assured, rich first novel most writers can only dream of producing. The fantasy world has a new star."
Rothfuss breaks fantasy convention by spinning a tale of a boy who grows up to be a master bard, thief, mage, warrior, and barkeep. Better yet, he makes it sound believable.

The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson
"In a storm-swept world where history has dwindled into myth, self-serving aristocrats squabble over mystical weapons that render their bearers immune to mundane attacks. The ambitious scholar Shallan learns unexpected truths about the present, the virtuous aristocrat Dalinar reclaims the lost past, and the bitter and broken slave Kaladin gains unwanted power. Race-related plot themes may raise some eyebrows, and there's no hope for anything resembling a conclusion in this introductory volume, but Sanderson's fondness for misleading the reader and his talent for feeding out revelations and action scenes at just the right pace will keep epic fantasy fans intrigued and hoping for redemptive future installments. "
Brandon Sanderson's best work to date. First book in a new series.

So, one satire, one sword & sorcery, and one high fantasy recommended.

GunZet
08-04-2011, 03:00 PM
Ever read the Artemis Fowl series?

I really like the first book, but the others just go down hill from there.

Rio
08-06-2011, 12:12 PM
Yeah, I read the first one but it didn't really hook me so I didn't continue the series. :\

Here's some other YA/J book series as well if you want quick, light reads:
Children of the Red King series (aka Charlie Bone) by Jenny Nimmo
Septimus Heap by Angie Heap
The Oracle of Delphi Keep by Victoria Laurie
The Lost Journals of Ven Polypheme by Elizabeth Haydon
Land of Elyon series by Patrick Carman
Dealing with Dragons series by Patricia C. Wrede